The 14 Squat Variations Every Runner Should Do For Better Performance

The 14 Squat Variations Every Runner Should Do For Better Performance

Disclosure: As an Amazon Associate and an affiliate for some reputed brands, I earn from qualifying purchases at no extra cost you. I may recieve a commission if you purchase something mentioned in this post. See more details here.
Squats are the best friend for runners. This is probably one strength move that every runner should do irrespective of their level.

This is a foundational form, that will help any beginner runner to improve quickly and will make you run faster and longer.

Also, if you regularly perform this exercise, you will be able to improve in other aspects of running, like improving the strength of your legs, improve your knee stability, improve your body awareness, avoid injuries and also fix muscle imbalances if any…

Benefits Of Squats For Runners

If you are still not convinced that you should perform squats, here are some benefits that will change your mind.

Increased Strength

Strength training and running go hand in hand. If you are a runner and want to avoid injury, you should include strength training in your routine.

Being a complex form of exercise, the squat is one of the best ways to strengthen a lot of muscles together.

Together, squat works on your Achilles, Calves, Quadriceps, hamstrings, hips, glutes, and core. Not only the strength of muscles, but squats also increases your endurance.

Strong Core

A squat is a form of exercise, that targets your lower body. However, to hold the form correctly and avoid injuries, you will have to engage your core.

So, along with the muscles of your lower body, squat also gives you a stronger core.

Although the basic squat is a very good form of exercise, if you include other variations of the squat into your routine, you will have an even stronger and more activated core.

Improved Knee Stability

The stability of your knees is dependent on 4 major ligaments.

  • An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)
  • A posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)
  • Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL)
  • Lateral Collateral Ligament (LCL)

However, the stability of your knees is also dependent on the muscles around your knees. So, if you improve the strength of these muscles, they will directly stabilize your knees. This is exactly what squats do. They strengthen the muscles around your knees and directly stabilizes your knees.

Prevents Injury

Many runners have to deal with IT band syndrome. However, if you can improve the strength of your hip abductors and your quads, this can be reduced significantly.

Also, doing regular squats may also help you to prevent osteoarthritis during your prolonged running career.

Improved Co-ordination

When you are doing squats, many parts of your body are essentially moving together. You cannot achieve a good form if all the parts are not working together.

This essentially improves your coordination and body awareness.

Improved Mobility

When you perform squats you are making your body go through a whole range of motions. The more you perform squats, the better your range of motion becomes.

In this way, squats improve your mobility a lot.

Strengthens legs

Squats focus on the lower part of your body and make the muscles like calves, quads, hamstrings, and glutes to work support the form.

This effectively improves the strength of your legs and makes you a better runner.

What is the correct form of a Squat?

When you sink into a squat, this is essentially how you will look:

  • Arms should be straight in front. You can raise them above your head also.
  • Thighs are parallel to the floor.
  • Knees behind the toes.
  • Straight back.
  • Neutral head position.

 

Squat exercises for runners

1. Basic Squat

This is the primary form of squat that you should master before you move onto any other form of squat.

Here is how you should perform it:

Steps

  • Start with your feet hip-width apart, toes facing front, hand by your side.
  • Raise your arms to your shoulder height with fingers pointing at the front.
  • Now start bending your knees as you go down gradually. Imagine you are trying to sit on a chair.
  • Keep your back completely straight.
  • Stop once your thighs are parallel to the floor.
  • Pause for a couple of breaths.
  • Press on your feet and engaging your core gradually come back to your starting position.
  • Repeat this 5-10 times and for 3 sets.

 

2. Weighted Squats

Once you have mastered the basic squat technique start adding some weights to your squats.

The essential movement of this type of squat is the same as a basic squat, however, here you will be holding a barbell, dumbells, or a resistance band at your shoulder height.

If you are working out at home, probably dumbells or resistance bands will be a better choice due to their portability.

If you don’t want to spend again and again on dumbells as you keep getting used to the weight, you can purchase adjustable dumbells that are on sale. Otherwise, sending one time on a set of quality resistance bands can also be very budget-friendly.

Here is how you should do weighted squats…

Steps

  • Stand with legs hip-width apart and back straight with the hand holding the dumbells hanging comfortably on the side.
  • Fold your elbows so that the dumbells are at your shoulder height.
  • Now start bending your knees and begin to sit down. Keep your back straight.
  • Once your thighs are parallel to the floor, pause for a couple of breaths.
  • Now gradually come up by pressing on your heels and engaging your core.
  • Do this for 5-10 rounds and 3 sets.

3. Mini band squat

This is another form of squat that you can do with a mini band or a mini resistance band.

It is similar to the previous form of the squat but, here rather than raising the resistance band till your shoulder, you will be wearing it above your knees. This way, as you will have to hold the resistance band in place, you will have to engage your core more.

Also, for this one, you will have to use mini bands. However, this piece of equipment is probably one of the most inexpensive workout equipment and a set of 4 is available for less than $10 bucks.

Steps

  • Stand with legs hip-width apart and back straight with the hand hanging comfortably on the side.
  • Wear the mini bands above your knees such that, the bands don’t fall off.
  • Now start bending your knees and begin to sit down. Keep your back straight.
  • Once your thighs are parallel to the floor, pause for a couple of breaths.
  • Now gradually come up by pressing on your heels and engaging your core.
  • Do this for 5-10 rounds and 3 sets.

4. Wall Squats

This one of the most challenging forms of squats that you will come across. Here, your core will be engaged more.

If you perform this exercise after a set of conditioning workouts, it will be more effective as the rest of your body will be tired and will have to engage the required muscles for a perfect form. Also, in the conditioning classes for kickboxing, this is what our instructors used to do.

Steps

  • Stand with your back against the wall and your legs hip-width apart.
  • Now straighten your arms in front of you with your palm facing the floor.
  • Gradually slide down, till your thighs are parallel to the ground.
  • Once your thighs are parallel to the floor, pause for a couple of breaths.
  • Now gradually slide up by pressing on your heels and engaging your core.
  • Do this for 5-10 rounds and 3 sets.

5. Sumo Squats

This will build flexibility and strength in your inner thighs and also works on your gluteal adductor muscles.

The upper body stance is very similar to that of normal squats. However, for the lower body, the stance is much wider and the toes point outwards.

The result is a much intense squat and you will develop immense strength in your inner thigh muscles.

Steps

  • Stand with your legs much wider than your hips with toes pointing to the sides if possible. If not make this angle as much bigger as possible.
  • Now lean a bit forward, maybe around 30 degrees, and start going down.
  • Keep your back straight and go down as much as possible.
  • Once you have reached your limit, hold the pose for a couple of breaths and come up to the starting position.
  • Do this for 5-10 rounds and 3 sets.
  • You can make it more challenging by not leaving forward.

6. Tempo Sumo Squats

This is a bit more advanced than the sumo squat and involves using some form of weight. The weight can be a dumbbell or a resistance band.

Also, in this type of squat, there is are some counting involved and the movement should happen using counting.

For example, when you are going down, you can count till three or four, then hold the pose for 1 count and come back up using 1 count. In other words, you are using a tempo of 4-1-1.

Steps

  • Stand with your legs much wider than your hips with toes pointing to the sides if possible. If not make this angle as much bigger as possible.
  • Your hands should be dangling at the front holding the dumbbell or the resistance band.
  • Now lean a bit forward, maybe around 30 degrees, and start going down for a count of 4.
  • Keep your back straight and go down as much as possible.
  • Once you have reached your limit, hold the pose for 3 counts.
  • Come back with one count.
  • Do this for 5-10 rounds and for 3 sets.

7. Pulse Squats

This type of squat is a bit different than the other squats. However, the benefits are stronger core, stronger glutes, and improved coordination.

Steps

  • Stand with your legs hip width apart.
  • Start bending your knees and lowering your upper body until your thighs are parallel to the floor.
  • Now pulse 2 times means, very short up and down movement, just raising a bit and then again sitting down.
  • Keep your back straight and don’t lean forward or your knees shouldn’t roll towards each outher.
  • Do this for 5-10 rounds and for 3 sets.

8. Squat Jumps

This type of squat is a bit different than the other squats. However, the benefits are stronger core, stronger glutes, and improved coordination.

Steps

  • Stand with your legs hip-width apart.
  • Start bending your knees and lowering your upper body until your thighs are parallel to the floor.
  • Now jump upwards and land straight on the feet. This is one rep. Make sure to land with your whole feet.
  • Do this for 5-10 rounds and for 3 sets.

9. Side-kick Squats

If you perform lateral kick with squats, your glutes, quadriceps, and hamstrings will get stronger. Also, it can work as an effective cardio warm-up. Here is how you should do it.

Steps

  • Stand with your legs hip-width apart.
  • Start bending your knees and lowering your upper body until your thighs are parallel to the floor.
  • Now come back up and as you stand straight, lift your right leg to the side while keeping it straight.
  • Put your leg down and go down in a squat again and come back up and lift your left leg.
  • Do this for 5-10 rounds and for 3 sets.

10. Curtsy Squats

This variation of squats is great for strengthening your entire set of glute muscles. Also, it strengthens your calves, quadriceps and improves your coordination, balance, and body awareness.

Steps

  • Stand with your legs hip-width apart.
  • Start by having your left foot in front and place your right foot diagonally back of your left foot.
  • The right knees will be almost at the back of your left knee.
  • Now start bending your knees until your left thigh is parallel to the floor.
  • Stand back up and repeat with your right leg in front of you.
  • Do this for 5-10 rounds and for 3 sets.

10. Bulgarian Split Squats

The Bulgarian Split Squats are more focused on your glutes and hamstrings. Also, since you have to balance yourself on one leg, your obliques are also activated.

Steps

  • Stand with your legs hip-width apart with a bench behind you.
  • Place the top of your foot on the bench in such a way that your ankle rests on it.
  • Your back should be straight.
  • Now start bending your knees until your left thigh is parallel to the floor.
  • Stand back up and repeat with your right leg in front of you.
  • Do this for 5-10 rounds and for 3 sets.

Once you are accustomed to the basic movement, consider adding some weights using a dumbbell.

11. Squat Box Jumps

The squat box jump is similar to the squat jump but your landing will be on a box, bench, a stepper. After a couple of these moves, your whole glute and core will feel it.

Prerequisite

You should be able to do squat jumps before you try this as this is a more advanced type of squat.

Precautions

  • Make sure your entire foot lands on the box and your heels or your toes are not dangling outside the box edge.
  • Start with a lower height like 6 inches and gradually progress to a higher height as you get comfortable.

Steps

  • Stand with your legs hip-width with your back straight.
  • Lower yourself into a squat.
  • Now do a controlled jump and lamp onto the box in front of you.
  • You can either jump back down or step back down.
  • Do this for 5-10 rounds and for 3 sets.

12. Frog Jumps

Frog jumps are a good way to take your squatting exercise to the next level as a runner. It not only works on similar groups of muscles as squats, but it also works on the entire calf, ankle joints, and every part of your feet.

Also, it develops a great amount of strength to your core and is great from cardio. Plus, it gets your body used to the high-impact movement that is regular to your running.

Prerequisite

You should be able to do sumo squats as the standing posture and the movement are more like a sumo squat rather than a basic squat.

Precautions

  • Make sure your entire foot lands on the floor and not your toes or heels. This will ensure that you can perform this exercise without getting injured.
  • You don’t have any injury in your knees.

Steps

  • Stand as you would for a sumo squat.
  • Lean a bit forward and go down until your fingers touch the floor.
  • Jump straight up as high as you can.
  • Land on the floor with your entire feet and go down in a squat. This is 1 rep.
  • Do this for 5-10 rounds and for 3 sets.

13. Figure Four Squats

Ah! another challenging form of squat. Do it right and you will have all the benefits of squats plus improved balance.

Precautions

  • Do it near a wall initially so that you can support yourself if you lose balance.
  • Also, placing a hand on the wall will help you to support yourself.

Steps

  • Stand with your legs hip-width apart.
  • Place your left leg on your right leg in such a way that your left ankle should be on your right knee.
  • Now go down in a squat and pause when your right thigh is parallel to the ground.
  • Pause for a couple of breaths and stand up.
  • Do this for 5-10 rounds and for 3 sets.

14. Pistol Squats

Pistol squats or the single-legged squat as they call it not only works on your lower body but also improves your stability, ankle mobility, and more.

However, this is a very challenging squat and you can start with a single-legged chair squat.

Steps

  • Stand with your legs hip-width apart.
  • Raise your left leg off the ground to about 30 degrees.
  • Keep the leg straight and keep it locked.
  • Now with the help of the right leg, gradually sit down in a squat.
  • Keep the left leg straight and in the air throughout the duration of the movement.
  • Now engage your core and press on the right feet and stand back up.
  • Do this for 5-10 rounds and for 3 sets.

References

Gains, Brains To, and Training Plans. “Are Squats Bad For Your Knees?.”

Nakagawa, Theresa H., et al. “Trunk, pelvis, hip, and knee kinematics, hip strength, and gluteal muscle activation during a single-leg squat in males and females with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome.” Journal of orthopaedic & sports physical therapy 42.6 (2012): 491-501.

Caterisano, A., et. al. (2002). The effect of back squat depth on the EMG activity of 4 superficial hip and thigh muscles. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 16(3), 428-432.

Escamilla, R.F. (2001). Knee biomechanics of the dynamic squat exercise. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 33, 127–141.

McBride, J.M., Blow, D., Kirby, T.J., Haines, T.L., Dayne, A.M., & Triplett, N.T. (2009). Relationship between maximal squat strength and five, ten, and forty yard sprint times. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 23(6), 1633-1636.

Molano, A. C. P., Jaramillo-Isaza, S., & Orjuela-Cañon, Á. D. (2019, October). Self-Organized Maps for the Analysis of the Biomechanical Response of the Knee Joint During Squat-Like Movements in Subjects Without Physical Conditioning. In Workshop on Engineering Applications (pp. 335-344). Springer, Cham.

Better Squatting for Better Running, by Nate Helming, Jan 22nd 2013. Competitor.

Squat Workout Challenges For Runners-min
Madhusree Basu

Madhusree Basu

Author, Admin

Blogger and a fitness enthusiast. She loves running and Yoga and everything in between. She started running to manage her weight and to eat to her heart’s content. A true foodie at heart she shares whatever knowledge she has gained throughout the years about weight management and fitness.

Related Posts

2 Miles Run Training Plan Beginners, Track, Advanced

2 Miles Run Training Plan Beginners, Track, Advanced

Disclosure: As an Amazon Associate and an affiliate for some reputed brands, I earn from qualifying purchases at no extra cost you. I may recieve a commission if you purchase something mentioned in this post. See more details here.

A lot of training plans are there online from many prolific runners and coaches. If you follow any of them you will be able to reach your goals. Then how are my ‘2 Miles Run Training Plan’ different? Well, not much, you will be able to reach your goals using them as well. The only difference is, it is a full training plan.

Meaning?

Most of the plans will tell you to do strength training along with running. However, they will not show you exactly what to do…What I’ve included here is the set of exercises, the reps, and the number of times you should perform them in a week.

In short, this will be a full training plan that you can follow and need not run around for additional information. 

So, without further ado, let’s start…

2 Mile Run Training Plan – Beginners

Prerequisites:

Before you get started, you would need to have a couple of gears. This will ensure that your training goes on smoothly.

Also, your gear requirement will change, if you choose any other form of strength training.

Here is a list

Run 2 Miles Training Plan For Beginners, Track, Advanced-min

Once you have the prerequisites in place, let’s proceed with the plan.

Here is the basic plan. We will run 2 miles from 0 miles in a span of 4 weeks.

In each week you will have 3 days of running, 3 days of strength training, and one day of complete rest.

Week 1

In this training program, we will take a walk/run approach for the entire duration. In the first week, you will be running, 1/2 mile, and walking 1/2 mile for two rounds on the scheduled days. Also, you will perform a set of yoga poses for the rest of the training days.

 

DayRoadTrack
11/2 mile run, 1/2 mile walk for two rounds 2 laps of the run, 2 laps of the walk for 2 rounds.
2

Perform these poses 3 rounds each:

Surya Namaskar – Left and right side count 1 round.

Downward Dog

Cobra

Plank

Squat

Chair

Warrior I, Warrior II, and Warrior III

Pigeon Pose

Seated Forward Fold

Happy Child

Child’s Pose

Perform these same poses
3 Same as Day 1Same as Day 1
4Same as day 2Same As Day 2
5Same As Day 1Same As Day 1
6Same As Day 2Same As Day 2
7RestRest

Week 2

This week you will add another 1/4 mile to your run and while the walking distance remains the same. This week we will include some more glute strengthening poses along with our regular ones.

 

DayRoadTrack
13/4 mile run, 1/2 mile walk for two rounds 3 laps of the run, 2 laps of the walk for 2 rounds.
2

Perform these poses 3 rounds each:

Surya Namaskar – Left and right side count 1 round.

Downward Dog

Cobra

Plank

Squat

Chair

Warrior I, Warrior II, and Warrior III

Pigeon Pose

Seated Forward Fold

Bridge Pose with one leg lifted

Reclining Half Pigeon

Reverse Plank

Happy Child

Child’s Pose

Perform these same poses
3 Same as Day 1Same as Day 1
4Same as day 2Same As Day 2
5Same As Day 1Same As Day 1
6Same As Day 2Same As Day 2
7RestRest

Week 3

In this week we will ramp up the training and will add another mile of run along with our 3/4 mile. Also, we will add one final pose to our yoga routine.

 

DayRoadTrack
11 mile run, 1/4 mile walk, 3/4 mile run 4 laps of the run, 1 laps of the walk, 3 laps of the run
2

Perform these poses 3 rounds each:

Surya Namaskar – Left and right side count 1 round.

Downward Dog

Cobra

Plank

Squat

Chair

Warrior I, Warrior II, and Warrior III

Goddess Pose

Pigeon Pose

Seated Forward Fold

Bridge Pose with one leg lifted

Reclining Half Pigeon

Reverse Plank

Happy Child

Child’s Pose

Perform these same poses
3 Same as Day 1Same as Day 1
4Same as day 2Same As Day 2
5Same As Day 1Same As Day 1
6Same As Day 2Same As Day 2
7RestRest

Week 4

Ah! our final week of training. This week we will run our miles. For this week the Yoga sequence will remain the same.

 

DayRoadTrack
11 1/2 mile run, 1/2 mile walk Run 6 laps, Walk 2 laps
2

Perform these poses 3 rounds each:

Surya Namaskar – Left and right side count 1 round.

Downward Dog

Cobra

Plank

Squat

Chair

Warrior I, Warrior II, and Warrior III

Goddess Pose

Pigeon Pose

Seated Forward Fold

Bridge Pose with one leg lifted

Reclining Half Pigeon

Reverse Plank

Happy Child

Child’s Pose

Perform these same poses
3 Run 1 3/4 mile and Walk 1/4 milesRun 7 laps and walk 1 lap
4Same as day 2Same As Day 2
5Run 2 milesRun 8 laps
6Same As Day 2Same As Day 2
7RestRest
2 miles Running-min

Training Plan For Running 2 Miles- Advanced

To run 2 miles any beginner runner will take around 22 – 25 mins. If you are a more advanced runner you can train to run this distance in around 15-18 mins.

The plan that we will provide you below, will help you to shave around 4 mins off your run time.

So, let’s begin.

Prerequisites:

The prerequisite remains the same as before. However, since some of the days will have interval training, having an app that can do just that will be great.

The number of training days will be similar to the last training with 3 days of run, 3 days of exercise, and one day of complete rest.

Every week for the next 4 weeks we will perform 1 long run and 2 interval runs. Also, we will do 3 days of power yoga.

Week 1

In this training program, we will take a walk/run approach for the entire duration. In the first week, you will be running, 1/2 mile, and walking 1/2 mile for two rounds on the scheduled days. Also, you will perform a set of yoga poses for the rest of the training days.

 

DayRoadTrack
1Run 5-6 miles at a pace comfortable to you 20-24 laps of the run at a pace comfortable to you.
2

Perform these poses 3 rounds each without stopping. If possible use a time to go hard and fast. Also, use the ujjayi breath to generate additional heat into your body:

Surya Namaskar – Left and right side count 1 round.

Downward Dog

Cobra

Plank

Squat

Chair

Warrior I, Warrior II, and Warrior III

Goddess Pose

Pigeon Pose

Seated Forward Fold

Bridge Pose with one leg lifted

Reclining Half Pigeon

Reverse Plank

Happy Child

Child’s Pose

Perform these same poses
3 Run as hard and fast as you can for 2 min, walk or lightly jog for 1 min and then repeat. Do this for 10 roundsRun as hard and fast as you can for 2 min, walk or lightly jog for 1 min and then repeat. Do this for 10 rounds
4Same as day 2Same As Day 2
5Same As Day 3 (If 4th week, then set a timer of 15 min and run 2 miles)Same As Day 3 (If 4th week, set a timer of 15 min and run 8 laps)
6Same As Day 2Same As Day 2
7RestRest
Running 2 miles on the trails-min

FAQs

How long does it take to train for a 2-mile run?

To train for a 2-mile run you would need 4-6 weeks of time. If you are a complete beginner, you may want to add 1 or 2 more weeks. Also, the time required by you to run this distance will hugely vary based on your age, gender, and the amount of practice you do. If you are irregular with your practice, this can take forever.

Is a 2 mile run good exercise?

Yes, a 2-mile run is a good exercise. It will improve your endurance, cardiovascular health, and overall fitness. It will also keep you in shape and will help you with weight management.

Also, with a little bit of effort, you can turn this 2-mile run into a more wholesome workout.

How?

The key is to vary the place and the ways you run. You have countless options like trying running on hills, or on the tails. Using a track run one day and roads one the next. You can also run on the beaches or try out interval training.

Other options can be to run for 2 min, do one strength training move…or run with a person who has a higher speed than you…If you think creatively the possibilities are endless.

Will running 2 miles a day tone my body?

Yes, running 2 miles a day will tone your body. After a couple of sessions, you will start observing, little changes in your body, like your thigh and hamstring, are getting firmer and so are your glutes.

You will start feeling lighter and your tummy will start to reduce in size. If you include some strength training exercises, you will observe that you are getting every inch of your body more defined.

All in all, 2 miles running can change your body and life forever, provided you stick with it.

Will I lose weight running 2 miles a day?

Yes, you will lose weight, running 2 miles a day. However, there is a caveat to that. you will in general have to change your lifestyle.

Meaning?

You will have to adopt different healthy habits like eating wholesome food, removing junk from your diet, reducing intake of sugary drinks, and training religiously.

If you do that, you will lose weight, however, without a proper lifestyle change, you may lose weight initially as your body will change with the challenge of running 2 miles, however, you will very soon reach a plateau. 

You will also observe that no matter what you do, your weight doesn’t seem to budge. So, a lifestyle change is required if you want to have a permanent weight loss. 

Madhusree Basu

Madhusree Basu

Author, Admin

Blogger and a fitness enthusiast. She loves running and Yoga and everything in between. She started running to manage her weight and to eat to her heart’s content. A true foodie at heart she shares whatever knowledge she has gained throughout the years about weight management and fitness.

Related Articles

How To Run 2 miles in 12 minutes in 30 days?

How To Run 2 miles in 12 minutes in 30 days?

Disclosure: As an Amazon Associate and an affiliate for some reputed brands, I earn from qualifying purchases at no extra cost you. I may recieve a commission if you purchase something mentioned in this post. See more details here.

You must have heard that running about how the military uses 2 miles as a criterion to get you accepted. However, running 2 miles is steadily becoming popular among runners and today we will find out how you can improve your 2 miles run time. More specifically, we will find out, how to run 2 miles in 12 minutes in 30 days? So, without ado, let’s get started.

How To Run 2 miles in 12 minutes in 30 days?

To run 2 miles in 12 minutes in 30 days you will have to run a long run of 5-6 miles, two easy runs of 2-3 miles each, two days of 5 rounds of interval training, and 2 days of strength training. However, you can also make one easy day as your rest days and switch out one strength training day with a hill training.

That is the barebone of a training plan that you must follow. However, if you want a detailed plan, below we have provided all the specifics. So read on…

How To Run 2 mile In 12 Mins In 30 Days-min

30 Days Training Plan To Run 2 Miles in 12 minutes

Follow the below training plan for 4 weeks and take a day of complete rest on the 29th day. Run 2 miles on the 30th day.

Here are a couple of things that I’ll assume before providing you with the plan.

I’ll assume that you have a good pair of running shoes that have at least 50% mileage left.

I’ll also assume that you will start your training on a Sunday and have laid out the plan accordingly. If you start on some other day, just start from the beginning and follow along…Also, following the order of the plan is important, as this sequence will help you to build your endurance faster…

Sunday

Jog for 5-6 miles. The pace should be somewhere around 10-11 mins per mile. Initially, you may not be able to jog that much, so combine jogging and walking but make sure you complete the distance. Also, as a beginner, you may not be able to go at that pace. Shoot for something like 15 min per mile.

However, if you feel any kind of pain or you hurt yourself, then don’t jog or walk the rest of the miles. This can aggravate your injury and ca throw you off your training track.

Monday and Tuesday

Go for easy runs on these two days. However, the distance should be about half what you have run on the previous day. So, stick to 2-3 miles each day.

Don’t go beyond that as you will not be seeing any significant gain.

So what should be your easy run pace?

You should be running at 55-75 percent of your 5K pace.

But if you are a beginner and have not run a 5K yet, then you will not have a reference point. In that case, run at 12-13 min per mile pace.

Wednesday

For interval training, you can use an interval training app to measure the time while you are focusing on running or you can use a treadmill if you have one at your disposal. Most of the treadmills nowadays come with programmable features, you can set it up once and you are done.

Go for 5 rounds of interval running. Each in each round you will run as hard as you can for 2 mins. Then take a break of 30 secs.

You can also go for running negative splits for this interval training. The first three rounds go at a slower pace. You don’t need to go all out. For the last two, go all out in a way that you will be huffing and puffing and out of breath after the last session.

Alternatively, you can also do negative splits for each round. If you choose to do so, run the first min of each interval slower than your usual pace and all out on the last min.

You may choose any of the methods, but whatever you choose, stick with it and be consistent with it.

Also, if you don’t want to run back to back on three days, you can do strength training on this day, and interval training on the next day.

Thursday and Friday

These are the two days that will make sure you are able to give your maximum effort during running. Also, this will minimize your chances of injury.

When doing strength training you should focus on your core, glutes, hamstring, calves, knees, and ankles. In other words, you should focus on the lower part of your body more so that it can take care of all the hard pounding that is coming up in the following week.

Here are articles on strength training that will give you a good head start:

Saturday

You should take complete rest on this day. Some light walking or moving around is fine, but don’t go for anything strenuous.

This will hamper your body’s recovery and you will find yourself getting injured more easily. However, if you can run 2 miles there is a lot of benefits to your fitness and endurance level.

Is running 2 miles in 12 minutes good?

Yes, running 2 miles in 12 minutes is good. However, there are a lot of factors that come into play. The main determining factors however will be your age, gender, and your overall fitness level. If you are on the younger side of the spectrum like between 20-29, irrespective of gender, 12 mins or under 12 mins is doable.

However, as you start to age, you tend to slow down, and attaining this time for a 2-mile run will gradually become difficult. But if you are determined enough, you can still do it.

How long should it take to run 2 miles?

To run 2 miles for a beginner runner, it should approximately take 25 to 30 mins. However, you can add a couple of more mins if you are overweight and running 2 miles. If you are running for some time and have a decent level of fitness, you should be able to run in 16-22 mins. And if you are in your prime, then running 2 miles in under 12 mins is a sure possibility.

Can you run 2 miles in 12 minutes?

You can run 2 miles in 12 minutes. However, there are a lot of factors that come into the picture as stated above. However, one thing that overrides almost everything is your willingness to do it and how consistently you put your efforts.

You can achieve 12 minutes and even 10 mins if you are putting in the effort and doing strength training. Without that, it is near impossible to achieve this. Also, if you wish to run this fast, keep in mind the following tips:

 

What’s a good distance to run in 12 minutes?

Here are the distances that you should be able to run in 12 minutes based on your fitness level and age:

 

AgeExcellentAbove AverageAverageBelow AveragePoor
Male 20-29over 2800 meters2400-2800 meters2200-2399 meters1600-2199 metersunder 1600 meters
Females 20-29over 2700 meters2200-2700 meters1800-2199 meters1500-1799 metersunder 1500 meters
Males 30-39over 2700 meters2300-2700 meters1900-2299 meters1500-1999 metersunder 1500 meters
Females 30-39over 2500 meters2000-2500 meters1700-1999 meters1400-1699 metersunder 1400 meters
Males 40-49over 2500 meters2100-2500 meters1700-2099 meters1400-1699 metersunder 1400 meters
Females 40-49over 2300 meters1900-2300 meters1500-1899 meters1200-1499 metersunder 1200 meters
Males 50over 2400 meters2000-2400 meters1600-1999 meters1300-1599 metersunder 1300 meters
Females 50over 2200 meters1700-2200 meters1400-1699 meters1100-1399 metersunder 1100 meters

Data Curtsy: Verywellfit.com

Madhusree Basu

Madhusree Basu

Author, Admin

Blogger and a fitness enthusiast. She loves running and Yoga and everything in between. She started running to manage her weight and to eat to her heart’s content. A true foodie at heart she shares whatever knowledge she has gained throughout the years about weight management and fitness.

References

Tolfrey, Keith, et al. “Physiological correlates of 2-mile run performance as determined using a novel on-demand treadmill.” Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism 34.4 (2009): 763-772.

Stone, B. L., Heishman, A. D., & Campbell, J. A. (2020). Effects of an Experimental vs. Traditional Military Training Program on 2-Mile Run Performance During the Army Physical Fitness TestThe Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research34(12), 3431-3438.

Gleason, Benjamin H., Jana E. Hollins, Hugo AP Santana, Brad H. DeWeese, and Michael H. Stone. “Performance training guidelines for the 1.5 and 2-mile runs.” Journal of Trainology 3, no. 1 (2014): 11-30.

Gojanovic, B., Shultz, R., Feihl, F., & Matheson, G. (2015). Overspeed HIIT in lower-body positive pressure treadmill improves running performance. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 47(12), 2571-2578.

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Too Fat To Run: 5 Tips For Heavy Runners To Make Running Easier

Too Fat To Run: 5 Tips For Heavy Runners To Make Running Easier

Disclosure: As an Amazon Associate and an affiliate for some reputed brands, I earn from qualifying purchases at no extra cost you. I may recieve a commission if you purchase something mentioned in this post. See more details here.

Oh! you cannot run, you are too fat…do you think it would make any difference? Oh! don’t bother, you are not going to reduce…It will be difficult for you to run…don’t try…Are you pestered by such comments from your friends and family?

Are you doubting yourself that you cannot run? Do you think you are too fat to run? Well if so, here are some tips that will make your running easier…Also, we have answered some very popular questions and provided some guidelines for heavy runners to get started…

Too fat to run-min

5 Tips For Heavy Runners To Make Running Easier

Start small

This is probably the most loosely given advice when it comes to running. Everyone will say, oh! start small…and then they will say, run 1 mile non stop and then take a breather.

But you are just starting out, and many of us who are running for some time have forgotten our starting days. If you are just starting out, then start by taking baby steps, and by that, I mean real baby steps.

First of all, don’t start running right away, but gradually build up to it…

Instead, start by walking. Walking is one of the most natural movements of your body and it is pretty much used to the mechanics…Also, it is not very impactful on your joints and you need not focus too much on the form as your body instinctively knows that.

For the first couple of weeks start by walking some distance…Do anything that is comfortable for you…

To understand your threshold, go walking for three consecutive days…and walk till you feel like you need to catch a breath…

Take an average of that and for the following sessions stick with that…

This way you will be stretching your limits but not too much that you will give up…Also, aim at going for a walk for at least 3 days…

Use a comfortable shoe

This may seem obvious, but you will be surprised that many beginners skip this essential step.

If you don’t want to spend a bunch of money as you are not sure about continuing, go for a running shoe for heavy runners.

These shoes will support your weight properly and will also, provide you with great impact absorption. Also, they will not fall apart easily and leave you high and dry…

You need not spend any money on any other gear, but a good running shoe is a must. This will make sure that your joints are protected and you don’t end up getting plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis or a bad knee.

This obviously comes down to, how much it will cost?

To be honest, I’ll not go for something below $40. The materials used to construct such budget shoes are not good and sometimes may be harmful to your body.

But if you are getting a discount on some great shoes, you may want to grab that…The quality will be good and it will be lighter on the pocket…

Strengthen your glutes, hips, and legs

Let’s face it…if you are on the heavier side of the scale, you are more prone to injuries related to running…

Why?

Mainly because your knees and your lower body have to deal with your extra weight. Plus, through years of no exercise, the muscles of your legs, glutes, and hips have weakened and these are the muscles, that will protect you from your injuries.

So, include exercises to strengthen these muscles…If you include 2 days of training along with your walking/running, you will be able to see significant improvement in a short span of time.

But what exercises should you do?

If you are just starting to run, you may not know where to start from…here are some articles that will help you to create your own strengthening routine.

Not only the hips, glutes, and legs, I’ve included some core exercises in the above list as well. This will help you to take a more holistic approach to exercises.

If you cannot decide what to after reading the above article, just go with the 20-min workout routine provided above. That is great for beginners and will help you to get started.

Stick to a particular time

There is something magical about this…

If you go out for a walk or run, do it at a particular time. For example, if you go out at 5:30 AM, stick to that for a couple of weeks. Just know that I’m not advocating morning running…what I’m saying is to stick to any time that is convenient to you.

This will make you anticipate the session and will you will want to do it. This is what I learned by sticking with a scheduled time for yoga. This one habit kept me regularly during that time and somehow it has been embedded in me.

Now I find it much easier to get started during that time and love the anticipation. I tried to run in the morning in the past and still do, but my workout sessions are almost always scheduled in the evening at around 5:30 PM. I don’t know, but that magical stop keeps ticking, and getting started at that time makes me happy.

You can also, try this at a time that suits you well…It will help you to form the habit more easily.

Focus only on one session at a time

If you want to get into a running habit, you have to be consistent. But when you are a beginner, it may seem a daunting task to build up to 30 min of non-stop running.

So what shall you do?

Remember…baby steps…Just focus on today. And just keep going. Rather than focusing on top of the mountain, just focus on today’s training. This will automatically build your endurance over time. Even if you don’t focus on 30 min, you will reach there sooner than later.

So, keep going and happy running…

References

Advising the Obese Patient on Starting a Running Program

Considerations for Initiating and Progressing Running Programs in Obese Individuals

Bertelsen, Michael Leibach, et al. “The START-TO-RUN distance and RUNNING-RELATED injury among obese novice runners: a randomized trial.” International journal of sports physical therapy 13.6 (2018): 943.

Janney, C.A. and Jakicic, J.M., 2010. The influence of exercise and BMI on injuries and illnesses in overweight and obese individuals: a randomized control trialInternational journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity7(1), pp.1-11.

Alahmadi, M. A. (2014). High-intensity interval training and obesityJ Nov Physiother4(3), 211.

Umamaheswari, K., Y. Dhanalakshmi, S. Karthik, Nitin Ashok John, and Rehena Sultana. “Effect of exercise intensity on body composition in overweight and obese individuals.” J Physiol Pharmacol (2017): 58-64.

Lee, Duck-chul, Angelique G. Brellenthin, Paul D. Thompson, Xuemei Sui, I-Min Lee, and Carl J. Lavie. “Running as a key lifestyle medicine for longevity.” Progress in cardiovascular diseases 60, no. 1 (2017): 45-55.

Heden, T.D., Liu, Y., Park, Y., Dellsperger, K.C. and Kanaley, J.A., 2013. Acute aerobic exercise differentially alters acylated ghrelin and perceived fullness in normal-weight and obese individualsJournal of Applied Physiology115(5), pp.680-687.

Başkılıç, Halil Rahman, et al. “Effects of Exercise on Body Composition and Life Quality in Obese Individuals.” European Journal of Physical Education and Sport Science (2017).

Wang, Yong-Xu, Chun-Li Zhang, T. Yu Ruth, Helen K. Cho, Michael C. Nelson, Corinne R. Bayuga-Ocampo, Jungyeob Ham, Heonjoong Kang, and Ronald M. Evans. “Regulation of muscle fiber type and running endurance by PPARδ.” PLoS Biol 2, no. 10 (2004): e294.

Madhusree Basu

Madhusree Basu

Author, Admin

Blogger and a fitness enthusiast. She loves running and Yoga and everything in between. She started running to manage her weight and to eat to her heart’s content. A true foodie at heart she shares whatever knowledge she has gained throughout the years about weight management and fitness.

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Calves Sore After Running: How Do I Stop My Calves From Hurting When I Run?

Calves Sore After Running: How Do I Stop My Calves From Hurting When I Run?

Last Updated: February 28th, 2021

Disclosure: As an Amazon Associate and an affiliate for some reputed brands, I earn from qualifying purchases at no extra cost you. I may recieve a commission if you purchase something mentioned in this post. See more details here.

Sore calf muscles are a common problem for runners. It perfectly makes sense if your muscles hurt from an increased intensity. However, what if with the same intensity, it hurts too much after running, or worse, it keeps hurting when you run? If so, we have provided you with a detailed answer in the below sections…

How Do I Stop My Calves From Hurting When I Run?

To stop calves from hurting when you run you have to strengthen your calf muscles using exercises, increase your running speed or mileage gradually. Also, if you still end up having sore calves, use rest, ice, compression, and elevation or R.I.C.E principles to reduce the effect. Also, you should be fine within a couple of days.

To know more…read on…

Should I run if my calf hurts?

Yes, you can run even if your calf hurts. However, reduce the intensity and use some compressions sleeves during running. This will help in an increased blood flow in your legs and calves.

The principle that I follow is that I generally reduce the running/workout intensity by 30%. This makes it easier to manage while still keeping the running habit intact.

I recently did the same mistake of increasing my workout intensity rapidly. I’m able to do 40 squats in a row, for 3 sets.

I thought to add a resistance band to increase the intensity. Rather than starting as the lowest one, I started from the middle, thinking that I’m strong enough. 

Result?

I couldn’t almost walk for a week and climbing stairs were a nightmare and getting up after sitting down needed 2-3 tries.

In short…lesson learned…yet again…

Calves sore after running

When should I be concerned about calf pain?

Along with pain in the calf, if you experience any warmth, redness, or tenderness, you should immediately consult a doctor.

In case of ligament tear or any such injury to your calf muscles, you will not be able to put any weight on your leg. Follow whatever your physician suggests and take rest as much as possible.

Other than this, if you have a normal strain from running or overuse, most of the time, sufficient rest is what you need.

You may also use heating pads or soaking your legs in warm water to relax your legs and get some relief.

How long should you rest a calf strain?

You should rest a calf strain for at least 3 days. However, depending on the severity of the strain, it may take up to six weeks to fully recover. So, you should rest until you are pain-free or at least until the maximum amount of pain is gone.

Here are the different types of calf strains that may occur:

Grade I: Here, you will encounter minimal discomfort and pain. You should be able to do all the activities you are used to doing. There will be minimal to no limitation to your range of motion. You should be able to recover in 3-5 days.

Grade II: You will have some discomfort and your activities will be somewhat limited. You will be able to walk but may have to limp. The strained area will be tender to touch and may even have some swelling. You may need more than a week to recover.

Grade III: This is a more serious kind of injury. If you sustain this injury, you will have difficulty walking. In fact, you won’t be able to put any load on your legs and you may have muscle spasms, swelling, and bruising. You will need immediate medical attention with this one. Also, to recover from this injury, you would need more than 3 weeks.

Calf pain

What problems can tight calves cause?

Tight calves can cause a lot of problems like calf injury, Achilles tendonitis, plantar fasciitis, and other forefoot problems. Also, due to something called regional interdependence, it can also cause problems with your knees and hip.

However, you can prevent this from occurring by doing some simple exercises. The main motto of these exercises is to make your calves more flexible and supple.

Here are some exercises that can be very beneficial:

Standing wall stretch:

This will help you to prevent calf muscle cramps. These are the steps that you should follow:

  • Stand in front of a wall facing it.
  • Place your hand flat on the wall at shoulder level.
  • Place one foot away from the wall like you do during the lunges, however, your feet should be on the floor.
  • The leg nearer to the wall should be slightly bent at the knees.
  • Bent the front leg’s knees further until you feel a stretch on the calf muscles of your back leg.
  • Remember to keep both feet entirely on the ground.
  • Hold the position for 30 sec.
  • Return to your starting position.

Seated forward bend:

Here is what you would need to do:

  • Sit on the floor with both legs stretched in front of you.
  • Straighten your back.
  • Extend your arms fully up in the air.
  • Wiggle until both your buttocks is entirely on the floor.
  • Gradually bend forward until you feel a stretch on your hamstrings and your calf muscles.
  • Try to hold your toes. If not, anywhere on the leg is fine.
  • Hold the stretch for 10 breaths.
  • Return to starting position and repeat it 5 times.

Standing forward bend:

  • You will follow the exact same steps, as described above but while standing.
  • If you can reach the toes and want to increase the stretch even further, you may place your palms under your feet to deepen the bend.

Calf raises:

I’ve explained calf raises in detail in the post about bulking up your calf muscles. You can get all the steps from there.

If you do all these exercises, you will reduce the chances of getting a tight calf related injury to a minimum.

Stiff calf muscle

Does plantar fasciitis make your calves hurt?

No plantar fasciitis doesn’t make your calves hurt. On the contrary, if you have tight calf muscles, you may end up having plantar fasciitis.

If your calves are hurting, and you have plantar fasciitis, you may be dealing with a calf muscle that needs some attention.

Your first step, in such a situation, is to recover. Take an ample amount of rest until the pain subsides.

Once you are there, next try to strengthen and improve the flexibility of your calf muscles as described above.

Also, you will be able to reduce the occurrence of plantar fasciitis by improving the strength and flexibility of your feet.

Another often overlooked reason for plantar fasciitis and calf muscle pain is the shoe you are using. If you are a runner, make sure you use a proper running shoe to support your calves and not something that has been worn out completely. This solely can cause a lot of stiffness and pain in your calves.

How do you treat a recurring calf strain?

To treat a recurring calf strain you have to first find out the root cause and then eliminate it. There can be primarily two problems. Either you are doing a too intensive a workout or your calf muscles are weak. In both cases, you will have to recover first and then strength train your calf muscles.

If you strength train your calf muscles three times a week after recovery, then you should be able to see improvements in a short span of time.

Also, including some stretching for them will also make a significant difference.

Another thing to consider is the amount of stress you are putting your calf muscles through. If it is too much, then consider cutting it down to a comfortable level.

Once you are accustomed to that, start increasing the intensity by 10% every other week.

Follow the above guidelines and you should be in good shape and able to avoid calf strains.

References

Fields, Karl B., and Michael D. Rigby. “Muscular calf injuries in runners.” Current sports medicine reports 15.5 (2016): 320-324.

Ryan, Michael, Maha Elashi, Richard Newsham-West, and Jack Taunton. “Examining injury risk and pain perception in runners using minimalist footwear.” British Journal of Sports Medicine 48, no. 16 (2014): 1257-1262.

Holzbeimer, R. G., and C. Stautner-Bruckmann. “Calf pain in runners may be caused by venous insufficiency.” European journal of medical research 13.5 (2008): 218.

Fahlström, M., Jonsson, P., Lorentzon, R. and Alfredson, H., 2003. Chronic Achilles tendon pain treated with eccentric calf-muscle training. Knee surgery, sports traumatology, arthroscopy, 11(5), pp.327-333.

Fuller JT, Thewlis D, Buckley JD, Brown NA, Hamill J, Tsiros MD. Body mass and weekly training distance influence the pain and injuries experienced by runners using minimalist shoes: a randomized controlled trial. The American journal of sports medicine. 2017 Apr;45(5):1162-70.

Madhusree Basu

Madhusree Basu

Author, Admin

Blogger and a fitness enthusiast. She loves running and Yoga and everything in between. She started running to manage her weight and to eat to her heart’s content. A true foodie at heart she shares whatever knowledge she has gained throughout the years about weight management and fitness.

Related Posts

How To Build Calf Muscles For Skinny Legs?

How To Build Calf Muscles For Skinny Legs?

Last Updated: February 27th, 2021

Disclosure: As an Amazon Associate and an affiliate for some reputed brands, I earn from qualifying purchases at no extra cost you. I may recieve a commission if you purchase something mentioned in this post. See more details here.

A well-formed calf muscle will not only enhance the looks of your legs but will also help you to avoid a lot of injuries like plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, etc. If you want to develop your calf muscles and are worried about your skinny legs, the below guide will provide you all the required steps to get started properly. This guide will be beneficial for runners and non-runners alike.

How To Build Calf Muscles For Skinny Legs?

To build calf muscles for skinny legs, you will have to increase the intensity of your workout for the calf muscles and will have to have a lot of protein. You can also include incline walks or run in your schedule or walk around your house with weighted ankle belts.

If you want to know more and get the detailed steps, then read on…

How To Build Calf Muscles For Skinny LegsHow To Build Calf Muscles For Skinny Legs

5 Exercise to build calf muscles for beginners

If you have skinny legs and want to develop your calf muscles, probably you are just starting off with a training regime or running.

However, you can build your calf muscles simply by increasing the intensity of your day to day activity. If you want a more focused approach, here are some dedicated calf exercises for beginners that will increase the strength of your calf muscles. This will also help you to avoid calf pain when you begin your training.

1. Walking/Running on an incline

This technique you can use both indoors or outdoors.

Steps:

  • Find an incline. (For treadmills you can set them according to your comfort level. Don’t go overboard with this).
  • Start by walking or running on that incline for 15-20 min.
  • Do this 3 times a week.

One word of caution. If you are just starting, you might be tempted to skimp spending on your running shoe. The effects will be detrimental and you will have to deal with a lot of soreness and stiffness afterward. Avoid this mistake and get yourself a proper running shoe that will save you from this aftermath.

If doing this outdoors, you can run on a higher elevation road or a hill. For me, hills are far away from my residence, but there are some parks which have different terrains. I generally run there if I want to do more calf muscle intensive training.

2. Calf-Raises

This is an exercise that will put direct pressure on your calf muscles. Also, there are some variations that will increase its effectiveness more.

Steps:

  • Spread your legs hip-width apart while standing in front of a wall.
  • Place your hands on the wall at shoulder level.
  • Raise your heels as high as possible keeping your toes on the ground.
  • Hold for a couple of seconds.
  • Lower your heels to the ground.
  • Repeat for 40 counts of 4 sets.

There are many variations of this basic exercise. You can do this while seated and placing some weight on your lap.

If you get used to normal standing raises, you can try to increase the difficulty by placing some weights on the shoulders.

You may as well challenge yourself by wrapping some weights around your ankles.

3. Walking around with ankle weights

This may be one of the easiest ways to build your calf muscles yet very effective. You will not have to dedicate any extra time to work your calf muscles. Also, you can use this technique while you are doing your household.

Steps:

  • Get an ankle weight of your choice. It’s better to start with a lighter one.
  • Tie it around your ankles and go on to do your household work.
  • You can keep it on for 30-40 min and then untie it.
  • Also, if you want, you can use these weights while you are running outside or on your treadmill.
  • You should be able to see visible results in a couple of weeks.
Standing Calf Raise

4. Calf flex with resistance band

This is another easy technique that you can do from the comfort of your home. Also, you will need only a resistance band to implement this.

Steps:

  • Sit with your leg stretched in front of you.
  • Straighten your back.
  • Wrap a resistance band around your feet.
  • Now flex with your toes pointing to the front and away from you. Then flex in backward so that your toes point towards yourself.
  • Do this for 20 times 3 sets.

You need not go beyond 20 reps with this exercise. If you feel that this is becoming too easy for you, then increase the resistance by using a higher resistance band or combining more than one resistance band.

5. Sprinting

This is one of the most common ways to develop your calf muscles. Also, you will be doing two things at once. You will be working on your speed and also you will be improving the strength of your calf muscles.

Steps:

  • Decide on the length and duration of your sprint.
  • Run as hard as you can as the timer goes off.
  • Take rest for 30 secs.
  • Repeat 2 more times.

Increasing the intensity of your running will put additional stress on your calf muscles forcing them to adapt and get stronger.

Do these exercises 3 times a week to see some visible results sooner. However, when performing these exercises, keep in mind that you should not commit the below mistakes to jeopardize your results.

Calf exercises

Mistakes to avoid when trying to develop your calf muscles

While dedicating a certain amount of time to develop your calf muscles will yield faster results, make sure you avoid the below mistakes.

Focusing only on exercises

If your legs are leaner then it goes beyond saying that you are a lean individual. Based on your fitness level, you may be either strong or needs to improve your strength.

However, no matter what, focusing only on calf raises will not get you very far. You will have to work on your nutrition.

To develop more muscles, most of us use a more protein-based diet. Include lots of fish, eggs, lean meat in your diet. Vegetarians can go for paneer, tofu, and legumes.

If you don’t take care of your diet, you will not see many results. Your diet is probably the most important thing when you want to see a lasting change.

Calf muscle stretching

Too much too quickly

More weights equal more muscle. This is the mindset that most of us have.

And who doesn’t want to save some time…

So what you do?

You go all out and overload yourself with the most challenging workout and fail. You are sore for days and so much so that you don’t want to work out again.

Worse, you hurt yourself and have to tend to your injury and be on a break for a couple of weeks.

To avoid all these, start slow…you will have to get used to the workout first, and then increase the intensity gradually.

Also when you are starting, pick up 1 or 2 exercises from the above-mentioned list and focus on getting better at that.

Not putting sufficient efforts

This problem is the polar opposite of the mistake described above. Here you are not challenging yourself enough to see a proper result.

Here either you are going for way fewer reps or running with not enough speed. To tackle this problem here is what you should do.

Find out your failure point. This is the point after which you cannot do another rep without compromising your form.

Once you have figured that out, do 3 fewer reps than that number. Effectively you will be putting in just enough work and your muscles will be not so sore that you will give up on your workout.

Conclusion

If you follow the above guidelines and stick to your workout schedule, you will be able to build your calf muscles fairly quickly, even if you have skinny legs.

Also, don’t only focus on your calf muscle, try to improve your overall fitness to have a more sustainable result.

References

Maffulli, Nicola, et al. “Eccentric calf muscle training in athletic patients with Achilles tendinopathy.” Disability and rehabilitation 30.20-22 (2008): 1677-1684.

Macklin, K., Healy, A. and Chockalingam, N., 2012. The effect of calf muscle stretching exercises on ankle joint dorsiflexion and dynamic foot pressures, force and related temporal parameters. The Foot, 22(1), pp.10-17.

Fisher, James P., Martin PD Bell, and Michael J. White. “Cardiovascular responses to human calf muscle stretch during varying levels of muscle metaboreflex activation.” Experimental physiology 90, no. 5 (2005): 773-781.

Madhusree Basu

Madhusree Basu

Author, Admin

Blogger and a fitness enthusiast. She loves running and Yoga and everything in between. She started running to manage her weight and to eat to her heart’s content. A true foodie at heart she shares whatever knowledge she has gained throughout the years about weight management and fitness.

Related Posts