How To Train For A 6km Run In 2 Weeks?

How To Train For A 6km Run In 2 Weeks?

Running 6km is a great way to get to become fit. However, if you have never run in your life then it may be a giant hill to overcome. But what if you have challenged yourself to run 6km in 2 weeks? Is it possible to train for a 6 km run in 2 weeks? It is possible, here is how…

To train for a 6km run in 2 weeks, run in the morning for increasing stamina, and do strength training in the evening using compound movements like squats, box jumps, and burpees with push-ups.

How To Train For 6Km Run In 2 Weeks

Training Plan to run 6Km in 2 weeks…

Before you start training for a 6Km in 2 weeks, here is a word of caution. If you are someone who has never run in life, these 2 weeks going to be tough.

First of all, your body is not at all used to running and it has to first get used to it.

Also, since your joints are used to carrying your load like this, you may feel a lot of pain and may not want to continue. If this is the first time that you are running, it is good to use a knee brace and ankle strap.

This will provide you with some additional support until your joints are strong enough to carry yourself.

Now let’s look at the training itself…

In this training, we will gradually increase the duration of running and initially, we will start with a short run…

Also, for the strength training, we will not only use compound movements but also, higher reps to increase your stamina…

Let’s begin…

Morning Training for running 6Km in 2 Weeks

In the morning session, we will focus on running…

Week 1

Day 1 – Run 2 mins, Walk 3-4 min, Run 2mins.

Day 2 – Run 5 mins, Walk 3-4 mins, Run 5 mins.

Day 3 – Run 8 mins, Walk 3-4 mins, Run 8 mins.

Day 4 – Run 11 mins, Walk 3-4 mins, Run 11 mins.

Day 5 – Run 14 mins, Walk 3-4 mins Run 14 mins.

Day 6 – Run 17 mins, Walk 3-4 mins, Run 17 mins.

Day 7 – Rest

Week 2

Day 1 – Run 20 mins, Walk 3-4 mins, Run 20 mins.

Day 2 – Run 23 mins, Walk 3-4 mins, Run 17 mins.

Day 3 – Run 26 mins, Walk 3-4 mins, Run 14 mins.

Day 4 – Run 30 mins, Walk 3-4 mins, Run 11 mins.

Day 5 – Run 35 mins, Walk 3-4 mins, Run 6 mins.

Day 6 – Run 40 mins or 6Km.

Day 7 – Rest.

In the above training plan, you will observe that we are not focusing on distance. Rather, we are focusing on time.

Most of the beginner runners will take around 35-40mins to finish 6Km. So, the complete focus of this program is to run a total of 40 mins.

This is easier to stick to as you will not be focusing on the distance, rather, you will focus on building your stamina.

Also, sticking to a time interval is easier than sticking to a distance interval.

We have broken up this running training into a pattern of run-walk-run. This is easier for runners who are just beginning to run. This will allow them to stick to the program without completely stopping or overdoing it.

Now that, we have done the run training, next it is time to build up your strength to carry you throughout the next 2 weeks…

Evening Strength Training To Run 6Km in 2 Weeks

If you want to run 6Km in 2 weeks successfully, not only will you have to focus on running, but also, you will have to build up your strength.

This will help you to run more efficiently, will improve your performance, and will also help you to avoid injuries.

Since we have a very short time to train for 6Km, we will focus on compound movements…

This will help us to target different muscle groups together and will help us to use the training time more efficiently.

Also, we will provide you with two different sets of strength training, one for gym-goers and the other for those who want to train from the comfort of their homes.

Ok…let’s get started…

Strength training (Gym-goers)

Squat with dumbbells

In this variation of the squat, you will be doing a basic squat while holding 5kg dumbbells in front.

SQUAT With Dumbbells Steps

Steps

  • Stand with your legs hip-width apart.
  • Hold the dumbbells in front of you with hands at shoulder height.
  • Now push your hips backward.
  • Start going down, until your thighs are parallel to the floor.
  • Come up with an explosive movement while squeezing your hips and tilting them slightly forward.
  • Do this for 30-35 reps, 4 sets.

If you cannot do this holding two dumbbells together, use only one and hold it at the ends with both hands.

However, focus on completing the repetitions as it will not only help you to improve your strength but also will help you to improve your stamina.

Box Jump

To start with the box jump, the first thing you need is to select a box. This you can do based on your height, like you are shorter than 5 ft 6 inches, go for a height of 14 to 16 inches.

If you are taller than that, then go for heights between 16 to 20 inches. However, most of us will be good with a height of a box around 16 inches.

Now that you have selected your box, here are the steps to do a box jump correctly…

Box Jump - Steps

Steps

  • Stand in front of the box at a short distance with your legs hip-width apart.
  • Now bend your knees a bit with your arms to the side in such a way that it helps you to propel forward.
  • Now jump up on the box with the help of your core and glutes.
  • Land softly and on your whole feet on the top of the box with your hands spread in front.
  • Now jump down softly.
  • Do this for 30-35 reps, 4 sets.

Battle Rope

Battle ropes are great for increasing strength and stamina. Due to the heaviness of the rope, it will take some strength to keep you firmly planted on the ground while performing this exercise.

Also, the movement will mostly happen from your forearm and wrist while engaging your glutes and core to keep you grounded.

Steps

  • Stand in front of the battle rope so that it is almost straight in your hands.
  • Stand with your legs hip-width apart with toes pointing outward.
  • Hold the battle rope slightly above the ends.
  • Now using your forearms and wrists raise the battle rope as high as possible and then return it to the ground. What you are trying to do is create a ripple effect in the rope.
  • Keep your back straight with your core and glutes engaged.
  • Do this for 30-35 reps, 4 sets.

Slam Ball Throwing

This is a great exercise for improving your stamina and strength together. It also works on your coordination and improves balance and core stability.

Steps

  • Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart.
  • Turn your toes outward around 30 degrees.
  • Hold a slam ball overhead with both of your hands.
  • Now push your hips backward like you do in a squat and throw the slam ball on the ground as hard as possible.
  • Throw the slam ball near your legs.
  • Repeat this 30-35 times, 4 sets.

Leg Press

This is an exercise that can be done both at home and in the gym. I’ll show you the version that I do at home. However, in the gym, you will have a machine with which you can do it.

Leg Press With Resistance Band - Steps

Steps

  • Lie down on your back with a slight bend in the knees.
  • Hold a resistance band with both hands and on the feet as shown in the picture.
  • Now straighten your knees.
  • Then relax your knees.
  • Do this for 30-35 reps and 4 sets.
  • Increase the resistance based on your strength.

Now that we have seen what exercises you can do as part of your strength training when you visit the gym, we will now see what you can do if you are strength training at home.

Both of these exercise routines are very effective and will help you to run a 6K in 2 weeks.

Strength training for home workout

Some of the workouts that you have seen above can also be included in home workout routines as well.

We will just mention that, however, we will not discuss them as you can get the details from above.

Let’s start…

Squat Jump

This is an exercise that is a great cardio and strength training exercise. It will strengthen your glutes and your core which are essential if you want to run longer distances like 6K.

Squat Jump - Steps

Steps

  • Stand with your legs hip-width apart.
  • Stretch your hands in front as shown in the picture.
  • Push your hips and go into a squat position.
  • Now push on your feet and with the help of your core and glutes jump as high as possible.
  • Land softly on your feet.
  • Do this for 30-35 reps and 4 sets.

Burpees With Push Ups

This compound movement will also serve you as a great exercise and at the same time will improve your cardio and strength.

BURPEES WITH PUSH UPS - STEPS

Steps

  • Start with your legs hip-width apart.
  • Bend down so that your hands touch the ground.
  • Now lay your palms flat on the ground and jump back coming into a plank.
  • Bending your elbows go down as low as possible.
  • Push up and come into a plank.
  • Jump forward with hands still on the floor.
  • Stand up and jump.
  • Repeat 30-35 reps, 4 sets.

Other than these two exercises include leg press with a resistance band and box jump into this strength training schedule.

Diet

If you want to run 6K in 2 weeks then not only you will have to focus on training, but you will also have to take care of your diet.

The first change that you need to do is to increase the amount of protein that you intake. For that, you have to go up to a protein intake of 2 grams of protein per kg of your bodyweight.

This amount of protein is a bit more than that which is generally taken as part of the diet, however, this will help you to build strength and recover faster.

Apart from that, you need to include two supplements into your diet. This will help you in faster recovery and if taken as prescribed will not cause any side effects.

Supplements

BCAA

BCAA or Branched-chain amino acids stimulates the building of protein in the muscles and also helps to reduce the muscle break down.

In other words, this will help you in faster recovery and will help you to retain muscle mass.

Glutamine

The other supplement that you need to take is Glutamine. Glutamine is the building block for making protein in the body. This means, it will help you in faster recovery.

However, please take these in prescribed quantity to avoid side-effects.

Precautions

Apart from following the above steps while training for 6K in under 2 weeks, you need to follow some precautions to minimize your chances of injury.

Avoid Overtraining

More training will not lead to faster running or better performance. If you are training for more than what is provided above, you will likely be overtraining.

However, if you are feeling too much fatigue, or lethargy after following the above steps, then that means the above training is too much for your body at this time.

Then cut down the training time in half and follow that. Sure you may take more time to accomplish your target…but you will be able to avoid the side effects of overtraining.

Avoiding Rest Days

This is something that we all are guilty of. We want to get faster results, so we train more. We give up on the rest days and train on those days as well.

This will yield results the same as overtraining. Your body will not get time to recover and will be tired and fatigued all day.

Also, this may become too much and you may even leave the training program halfway…

Skimping On Sleep

For some, sleeping is a waste of time, or they are so busy that they cannot afford to sleep for 6 hours a day.

However, when you are going through a rigorous training schedule like this one, sleep is essential for recovery.

Proper sleep will help you to repair your body faster and you will have more strength to run on the following day.

Avoiding using knee cap/brace and ankle brace

If you are a beginner runner and want to run 6Km in 2 weeks, then you will be suddenly putting a lot of pressure on your joints, especially the knee and the ankle joints.

So, to avoid any kinds of injury to these joints, it is better to add some extra support to them and use knee cap/braces and ankle braces.

This will help you to avoid any kind of subsequent pain.

However, most of us generally avoid this and become more prone to injury.

Run 6K in 2 Weeks
Madhusree Basu

Madhusree Basu

Author, Admin

Blogger and a fitness enthusiast. She loves running and Yoga and everything in between. She started running to manage her weight and to eat to her heart’s content. A true foodie at heart she shares whatever knowledge she has gained throughout the years about weight management and fitness.

Sourav Sarkar

Sourav Sarkar

Reviewer, Certified Fitness Instructor

Certified fitness trainer and an ex-professional bodybuilder, he has trained more than 500 fitness enthusiasts and has more than 15 years of on-the-job experience.

Are Hokas Good For Heel Strikers?

Are Hokas Good For Heel Strikers?

Hokas are very well-made shoes and are excellent for running. They are comfortable and have plush cushioning that helps you to run longer miles. But are Hokas good for heel strikers? Since 60% of runners and more than 70% of marathoners are heel strikers, this is a very important question to them.

Hokas are good for heel strikers as they have excellent heel cushioning and provide you with good shock absorption on landing.

ARE HOKAS GOOD FOR HEEL STRIKERS

Hokas are excellent running shoes. Most of them have thick cushioning and provide you with ultimate shock absorption.

However, there is one thing you should be aware of if you are a heel striker. When you land your Achilles area stretches a lot more than that of the runners who forefoot strikers.

Due to this, they are more prone to injuries like Achilles Tendonitis or other types of calf pains.

Hoka being a low-drop shoe brand, may not be able to help you if you have this kind of problem. Otherwise, they are great shoes for heel strikers.

Hoka Carbon X 3

HOKA CARBON X3

Is Hoka Carbon X 3 Good for Heel Stikers?

Hoka Carbon X has slightly more cushioning in the heel area as it has a heel-drop of 5mm. This additional cushioning along with the extended backward heel cushioning is good for heel strikers.

If you observe the silhouette of Hoka Carbon X above, you will find that the heel area is extended backward.

Also, the drop of this running shoe is around 5mm. Which means it has additional cushioning in the heel area.

Both of these come together to provide you with excellent protection against heel striking.

Hoka Mach Supersonic

HOKA MACH SUPERSONIC

Is Hoka Mach Supersonic Good For Heel Stikers?

Hoka Supersonic is good for heel strikers because the overall cushioning of this shoe is great and also has added cushioning in the heels.

Hoka Supersonic has a heel drop of around 5mm. This means the heel cushioning of this shoe is more.

Along with that, it has the cushioning of the heels is extended backward and provides you with further protection.

In Mach Supersonic you also have the ProFly+ topsole which adds another level of cushioning to these shoes.

All these together provide you with excellent heel cushioning and are great for heel strikers.

Hoka Gaviota 4

HOKA GAVIOTA

Are Hoka Gaviota bad for heel strikers?

No, Hoka Gaviota is not bad for heel strikers. It is an excellent shock absorber when you land on your heels as the cushioning of the heel area is high. Hoka Gaviota is good for heel strikers. The drop of Hoka Gaviota is 5mm. This makes the cushioning of the heel area slightly thicker than that of the forefoot. Also, Hoka Gaviota has an overall high heel and forefoot stack which means it has more cushioning overall. This makes it great for heel strikers and provides you with an excellent running feel.

Hoka Bondi 7

HOKA BONDI

Are Hoka Bondi Good For Heel Strikers?

Yes, Hoka Bondi running shoes are good for heel strikers. They have one of the thickest cushioning than any running shoe has which makes them excellent at shock absorption.

Hoka Bondi has the smallest heel drop among the Hoka running shoes. It has a 4mm drop which technically provides it slightly thicker heel cushioning.

Also, the overall stack height of Hoka Bondi is huge and makes it one of the comfiest cushioning around.

Along with that, it has a beveled heel that makes the landing on heels softer. All these factors come together to make Hoka Bondi a good running shoe for heel strikers.

Hoka Clifton 8

HOKA CLIFTON

Is Hoka Clifton 8 Good For Heel Strikers?

Hoka Clifton is good for heel strikers because it has a thick midsole with extra cushioning at the heels. It also has a beveled heel area for protecting you against heel landing.

Hoka Clifton is also a low drop shoe with a 5mm heel drop. However, the overall heel stack of this shoe is excellent and provides you with good cushioning.

Also, due to the thickness of the heel area, it is an excellent shock absorber and provides you great protection against heel strike.

It has a slightly beveled heel. This is an additional measure to protect you against a heel strike.

Hoka Arahi 6

HOKA ARAHI

Are Hoka Arahi Running Shoes Good For Heel Strikers?

Hoka Arahi running shoes are good for heel strikers. It has one of the thickest cushioning and the heel cushion is extended backward. This provides additional cushioning on landing.

Hoka Arahi is one of the most comfortable running shoes from Hoka. It has a huge midsole stack and provides you with one of the best shock-absorbing capabilities among running shoes.

Also, the cushioning of the heel area is extended backward. This provides additional cushioning on landing and extra shock absorption.

All of these features together make Hoka Arahi good for heel strikers.

Hoka Rincon 3

HOKA RINCON

Is Hoka Rincon Good For Heel Strikers?

Hoka Rincon is good for heel strikers because it has a decent amount of cushioning and thicker heel cushioning. This protects heel strikers from impact and is good for them.

Hoka Rincon has balanced cushioning. This means it is more responsive than some of the more cushy running shoes from Hoka like Arahi.

However, the cushioning that Rincon provides is great for heel strikers as it is thicker on the heel area.

Also, the heel cushion is slightly extended backward providing added cushioning. This is also beneficial for runners who land on their heels as this added cushioning will act as an excellent shock absorber.

Overall, Hoka Rincon is excellent for heel strikers.

Hoka Mach 5

HOKA MACH 5

Are Hoka Mach 5 Running Shoes Good For Heel Strikers?

Hoka Mach 5 is good for heel strikers. They have good midsole cushioning with added cushioning at the heel areas. It also has an added topsole and extended heel cushion to provide additional protection to heel strikers.

Hoka Mach has good midsole cushioning. It has a drop of 5mm. This provides you with slightly more cushioning at the heels.

Also, the heel area of this shoe is extended backward providing you with added cushioning on heel landing.

I would say that this kind of extension at the back actually encourages heel strike. Also, it has an improved topsole which is made from PROFLY+ material. It is an upgrade from PROFLY and provides you with a bouncier and cushy ride.

It also acts as an added cushioning material for heel strikes.

Hoka Clifton EDGE

HOKA CLIFTON EDGE

Is Hoka Clifton EDGE Good For Heel Striker?

Hoka Clifton EDGE is excellent for heel strikers as it has extended heel cushioning backward which protects you from a heel strike.

Hoka Clifton EDGE is a slightly enhanced version of the Hoka Clifton and that enhancement is purely visible in the heel area.

The heel of Hoka Clifton EDGE is extended outward and that acts as an additional cushioning when you land on your heels.

To some extent, this kind of heel extension actually encourages heel strikes. Anyways, apart from the extended heel area, the heel area cushioning itself is thicker.

This is an additional cushioning that when combined with the beveled heel, actually produces excellent protection against heel stikes.

Hoka Kawana

HOKA KAWANA

Should you use Hoka Kawana if you are a heel striker?

Yes, you can use Hoka Kawana even if you are a heel striker. It has good cushioning in the heels and has an extended heel area at the back along with the beveled heel structure. This provides protection if you are a heel striker.

Hoka Kawana is a lightweight decently cushioned responsive running shoe from Hoka. They have balanced cushioning and provide you with a comfortable ride.

It has slightly more cushioning in the heels which are good for a heel striker. Also, the heel area is extended backward.

This is an added level of cushioning for the heel strikers as this is the first part that lands on the ground when your heel strikes.

Also, the beveled heel area is also one of the other measures that Hoka Kawana has that helps you if you are a heel striker.

Hoka Elevon 2

Hoka Elevon

Is Hoka Elevon 2 Good For Heel Strikers?

Yes, Hoka Elevon is good for heel strikers. It has thicker cushioning in the heel area, protruded heel cushioning, and a beveled heel. All these are good for heel strikers.

Hoka Elevon is a well-cushioned running shoe that is great for heel strikers. It has thick cushioning in the heel area which is good for heel strikers.

The topsole of Hoka Elevon is made from PROFLY. This is a cushy and bouncy material and provides you with added cushioning.

Also, the heel area protruded outside acts as an added cushioning against heel strike.

The beveled heel also helps in shock absorption and is an added protection against heel striking.

Hoka Rocket X

Hoka Rocket X

Is Hoka Rocket X Good For Heel Strikers?

Hoka Rocket X is good for heel strikers as it has thick cushioning. This acts as a good shock absorber. Also, the carbon fiber plate helps in faster propulsion reducing the overall impact.

Hoka Rocket X is a running shoe with good cushioning. This makes it good for heel strikers. However, like some of the other models from Hoka, it doesn’t have an extended heel area for added shock absorption.

However, although it doesn’t have a thick cushioning, it has a carbon fiber plate which helps in its faster propulsion, and a more efficient toe-off.

Hoka Speedgoat 5

Hoka Speedgoat

Are Hoka Speedgoat 5 running shoes good for heel strikers?

Hoka Speedgoat 5 running shoes are good for heel strikers. It has compression-molded foam as the midsole and is great for shock absorption for heel landing.

Hoka Speedgoat is a trail running shoe from Hoka. However, it has a similar cushioning to Clifton.

It is responsive and has a protective toe rand and 5mm lugs to carry you through the uneven trails.

However, the cushioning of Speedgoat is excellent. It is good with shock absorption. It is slightly protruded outwards, which is an added cushioning for heel landing.

It also has a mild heel bevel which is an added advantage for heel landers.

Hoka Torrent 2

Hoka Torrent

Is Hoka Torrent 2 Good For Heel Strikers?

Hoka Torrent is good for heel strikers. The thickness of the heel area is more than that of the forefoot. This added cushioning is great for shock absorption during heel landing.

Hoka Torrent is a lightweight responsive shoe that is good for speed running. However, being a speed running shoe, it doesn’t have the midsole thickness like that of the other models from Hoka.

Regardless, it has some added cushioning in the heels and this makes it good for heel landing.

The shock absorption is decent and you will be able to move quickly from heel to toe when using this shoe.

Unlike many of the other models from Hoka, it doesn’t have that added extended heel cushioning which would have been better for heel landing.

However, it has PROFLY topsole which is an added cushioning and provides you with a bouncy ride.

Hoka Stinson ATR 6

HOKA Stinson ATR

Is Hoka Stinson ATR 6 Good Heel Strikers?

Hoka Stinson ATR is good for heel strikers as it has very heavy cushioning in the heel area. The heel area protruded outside and it has beveled heels for better shock absorption on heel landing.

Hoka Stinson ATR is a good trail running shoe for heel strikers. It is excellent with shock absorption and cushioning.

The heel stack of Hoka Stinson is excellent and stands at 37mm. This is a huge cushioning and is great for heel striking as it will provide you with optimal shock absorption.

Apart from a huge heel stack, the heel cushion is extended outside, which provides you with added cushioning on heel landing.

Also, since it has a beveled heel, it provides better heel landing with an increased surface area which provides better impact dissipation.

Hoka Speedgoat 4 GTX

Hoka Speedgoat Gore-Tex

Can Heel Strikers Use Hoka Speedgoat 4 GTX?

Hoka Speedgoat GTX can be used by heel strikers and is a good choice. It has thick midsole cushioning in the heel area along with cushioning extension in the back and a mildly beveled heel for better landing on the heels.

Like Hoka Speedgoat, Hoka Speedgoat GTX is good for heel strikers. It has a thick heel cushioning of 32mm.

This is a good heel stack and will provide you with excellent cushioning when you are landing on your heels.

Also, like Speedgoat, Speedgoat GTX also has extended heel cushioning at the back. This is excellent for heel strikers as it provides you with added cushioning on landing.

Apart from that, it is also a mildly beveled heel. This provides an added surface area on landing and improves the impact dissipation.

Hoka Zinal

Hoka Zinal

Is Hoka Zinal Good For Heel Strikers?

Hoka Zinal is good for heel strikers because it has a good amount of cushioning in the heels, extended heel cushioning, and beveled heels for better impact dissipation.

Hoka Zinal is a lightweight decently cushioned trail running shoe. However, the thickness of the heel cushioning is enough for it to have good impact absorption.

Also, the heel is slightly thicker than the forefoot and this adds more cushioning to the heels. There is a topsole in this shoe made of PROFLY material. This adds an additional layer of cushioning and bounce for the shoe.

The heel area is extended backward and this adds added cushioning to the heel on landing. Also, the mildly beveled heels will provide better shock absorption to the heel landers.

Hoka Mafate Speed 3

Hoka Mafate Speed

Is Hoka Mafate Speed Good For Heel Strikers?

Hoka Mafate Speed is good for heel strikers because it has a very thick heel cushioning. This heel cushioning is slightly extended backward to provide additional cushioning during heel landing.

Hoka Mafate Speed has one of the thickest midsole cushioning available for running shoes. This is excellent for shock absorption and provides you with a great running experience on the trails.

However, this cushioning is thicker in the heels and that acts as additional cushioning for heel strikers.

Also, the heel cushion is extended backward and adds to the existing cushioning of the midsole.

Hoka Anacapa Low GTX

Hoka ANACAPA LOW GORE-TEX

Is Hoka Anacapa Low GTX Good For Heel Strikers?

Hoka Anacapa Low GTX is good for heel strikers. It has a thick heel cushioning with extended heel support for better shock absorption. It also has a beveled heel which is good for impact dissipation for heel strikers.

Hoka Anacapa Low GTX is an excellent trail running shoe. It is comfortable and provides you with good shock absorption, even if you are a heel striker.

The heel area has a thicker cushioning and the heel stack is at a height of around 30mm. This is a good amount of cushioning and is great for heel strikers.

The heel cushioning is extended backward which is an added advantage for the heel striking runners.

The beveled heel also adds to this comfortable heel striking experience and helps with better shock absorption.

Hoka Challenger ATR 6

Hoka Challenger ATR

Is Hoka Challenger ATR 6 Good For Heel Strikers?

Hoka Challenger ATR is good for heel strikers. It has a thick cushioning especially at the heels. It also has beveled heels which are great for heel striking.

Hoka Challenger ATR is excellent for any terrain. It is a comfortable running shoe that can help you run both longer and shorter distances.

The thick cushioning that it has in the midsole is excellent for shock absorption. Also, added top layer is additional cushioning material.

The heel is extended backward and provides additional cushioning for the runners. Along with the beveled heel, it is excellent for heel striking.

Hoka TenNine

Hoka Tennine

Is Hoka TenNine Good For Heel Strikers?

Hoka Tennine is excellent for heel strikers. It has excellent heel cushioning which is also extended considerably on the outside to provide additional support to the heel strikers.

The construction of Hoka TenNine is such that, it encourages heel striking. This is one of the few shoes that encourages this kind of running pattern.

Also, the thickness of the midsole is also good. It is excellent with shock absorption and provides good cushioning at the heels.

One thing which is not present in Hoka Tennine is that it doesn’t have beveled heels. However, due to the length of exterior cushioning of the heels, you will hardly notice it.

Hoka EVO Jawz

Hoka EVO Jawz

Is Hoka EVO Jawz Good For Heel Stikers?

Hoka EVO Jawz is not good for heel strikers. The cushioning level is not very high as this is a speed shoe. Also, it doesn’t have any extended heel cushioning or beveled heels for better impact absorption during heel strike.

I would not prefer Hoka EVO Jawz for heel striking. The cushioning level of EVO Jawz is good. However, it is meant for speedrunning and shorter distances.

So, the level of cushioning is not as high as other models from Hoka. Also, unlike the other models, it doesn’t have any extended heel cushioning or beveled heels for better impact dissipation.

That is why it is better to not use Hoka EVO Jawz if you are a heel striker.

Hoka X Bodega Kaha Low GTX

Hoka X Bodega Kaha LOW GTX

Is Hoka X Bodega Kaha Low GTX Good For Heel Strikers?

Hoka X Bodega Kaha Low GTX is good for heel strikers. It has excellent heel cushioning, extended heel support, and beveled heels.

Hoka X Bodega Kaha Low GTX is a trail running shoe that is meant for the wetter regions. It is lightweight, cushy, and excellent for even long-distance running.

The heel cushioning of this shoe is also very good. It has a high heel stack that is excellent for shock absorption.

Also, the heel cushioning is slightly extended backward with a beveled heel. This makes the impact absorption even better and is excellent for heel strikers.

Madhusree Basu

Madhusree Basu

Author, Admin

Blogger and a fitness enthusiast. She loves running and Yoga and everything in between. She started running to manage her weight and to eat to her heart’s content. A true foodie at heart she shares whatever knowledge she has gained throughout the years about weight management and fitness.

Why Are ON Cloud Shoes So Expensive? (21 Reasons Why…)

Why Are ON Cloud Shoes So Expensive? (21 Reasons Why…)

On Running Shoes are one of the most comfortable running shoes on the market. They provide you with great comfort and excellent quality.

They are built on the radical philosophy of soft landings and explosive takeoffs. They have made this breakthrough using their CloudTec.

Although On Running produces excellent pairs of running shoes, are their sneakers worth the price?

Why are ON Cloud shoes so expensive? Let’s find out…

Why Are On Cloud Shoes So Expensive

Why Are ON Cloud Shoes So Expensive?

On Cloud or On Running shoes are so expensive because of the kind of materials that are used, procurement cost, logistics cost, factory charges, taxes, duties, etc.

ON Running shoes have a different approach towards their shoe. Their philosophy is different. To make that philosophy come true, they have to spend a considerable amount of money on innovations.

Along with the other reasons described below, the prices of ON Cloud becomes rather steep. However, although, the prices are steep, it is somewhat at par with the other shoe brands in the market.

If you are still curious about why are Saucony shoes so expensive, here are 21 reasons why:

1. High-Quality Material

The quality of materials that ON Running uses is of high quality. However, premium quality materials always come at a premium price.

This premium price although may seem negligible at the most elementary level, actually drives up the cost of manufacturing these shoes a bit.

When the manufacturing cost becomes more, the price of the finished shoes is also higher.

2. Precise Design

One of the hallmarks of quality from any manufacturer is how precise the design is and ON Running is no different.

They have perfected the design throughout the years and the shoes that they produce now are made with great precision.

However, getting something that precise to the market means, spending a lot of money on the quality check. This gets factored into the cost and makes these ON Cloud shoes expensive. 

3. Cost involving Innovations

Innovation is expensive and doesn’t produce any income for the company directly. Surely, it will produce profits down the line when the new models go out to the retailers…however, before that, there will be dozens of prototypes that are being rejected.

However, the company has to bear this cost and they have to somehow offset this. The only source of income that ON Running has is to sell its shoes.

So, to offset the cost of innovation, this is added to the price of the shoes. Although divided into the bulk the number attached to the cost becomes negligible. However, cumulatively, it drives up the selling price of the ON Running shoes.

4. Different Taxes and Duties In Different Countries

In a span of 10 years, ON Running has made its presence known in 50 different countries. This is an excellent feat that this company has achieved.

However, every country’s tax structure is different and so are the duties and customs taxes.

When selling a shoe in a country, all these get added to the price tag of the shoe. Based on the taxes, the prices of these shoes may slightly vary from country to country.

5. Brand Value

On Cloud Shoes has gathered a lot of brand equity in the last several years due to its excellent quality and craftsmanship.

As the brand value has increased so is the price of the shoes. This is completely understandable…

If you are purchasing a shoe from some unknown brand, you will not be willing to pay a steep price, whereas, if you purchase it from an established brand, you will obviously pay more.

6. High Demand

Due to the kind of sneakers that ON Running makes, their running shoes are high in demand.

As is the principle of supply and demand, if the demand is high, the prices rise. This is true for every type of product and On Running shoes are no exception.

As their demand is high, so is their price.

7. Inland Trucking

Once the running shoes are in their warehouse, they need to be moved from the manufacturer to the distributors or the retailers.

Most of the companies use inland trucking for the same…these trucks range from mega-sized trailers to decent-sized trucks that can be easily moved inside the cities or towns.

However, although this is a convenient option to transport the shoes, this is not cheap. With inland trucking comes the fuel costs, labor costs, loading and unloading charges, driver costs, toll taxes, etc.

This is added to the price of the shoes.

8. Rapid expansion in new markets

ON Running is a rapidly expanding company. It has already made its presence known in more than 50 countries and is not showing any signs of stopping.

When you expand into a new market, the profits don’t start rolling in immediately. However, the company has to bear the operational costs despite that.

So, the only way to offset this is to add this cost to the price tag of the shoes and that is what On Running did.

This further increases the price of the shoes.

9. Lightweight Comfort

On Cloud shoes are very comfortable and lightweight. To produce these shoes, On Running has to do a lot of prototyping and experiments.

This provided a completely innovative running shoe that is very lightweight and extremely comfortable.

However, the cost of this type of innovation got factored into the price and resulted in a steeper price of the On Cloud shoes.

10. Labor Cost

A company cannot run without manual labor. Sure a lot of processes can be automated, however, there will still be a considerable amount of money spent on manual labor.

With the gradual rise in the prices of all things, manual labor is also getting expensive day by day.

This is reflected in the prices of the shoes and their steeper prices.

11. Delicate Yet Durable

On running shoes don’t look anything like the regular running shoes that are available on the market.

They look delicate, stylish, and yet very durable. To come up with something like that is a mix of science and art.

And art is expensive…which is what the ON running shoes are…expensive.

12. Rapid Expansion Of The Product Line

The first model of On running shoes came to the market after more than a year of trial and error.

However, after that, within a span of 10 years, they expanded their product line to include more than 20 models of shoes, along with other sports wears.

This kind of expansion needs to be funded and that can be only done if the existing products are being sold at a higher price.

This is what ON Running did and the price tag of the shoes has become steeper.

13. Pulling profits for the investors

Although many will argue that the expansion is fuelled by the money of the investors, I also agree with that.

But investors invest only for profits. So, to churn out profits for them, companies have only a couple of options…out of which one is driving up the price tag of the products.

On Running also chose this one as one of the ways to pull profits for investors. This is why the prices of the On Running shoes are so steep.

14. Inflation

Like every company, On Running is also not immune to inflation. This is reflected in higher utility bills, labor costs, production costs, logistics costs, etc.

To offset that, the company has to pull the money from somewhere. One of the easiest ways to do that is to increase the prices of the On Running shoes.

15. Storage Cost

Once the running shoes are produced, they are shipped to the warehouses for storage. For that, the warehouses need to be procured first.

Most of the time, the companies rent the existing warehouses which are actually one of the major costs involved in the supply chain of these ON Running shoes.

Also, with inflation, the overall rent or leasing prices of these warehouses keep going up and this cost gets added to the overall price of the shoes.

16. One-Year Guarantee

This is pretty unique to On Running. They provide you with a one-year guarantee.

If anything happens to the shoes or you don’t like them, you can get your money back within one year of purchasing these shoes.

However, since this is a kind of risk, it needs to be hedged somehow and this is another reason for the steep prices of the ON Cloud shoes.

17. Higher Procurement Cost

Procuring raw materials from vendors is one of the most cost-efficient ways to get started with the production of shoes.

However, with the rising price index, these costs also have increased considerably throughout the years.

Due to this higher procurement cost, the prices of the On Running shoes are also getting steeper to accommodate this price.

18. Ocean Freight Charges

A major part of the On Running shoes are now manufactured in Vietnam. Once the shoes are produced, they are sent to their destination using Ocean Freights.

However, these Ocean Freights although somewhat cheaper than the other modes, still cost money to the company.

And to offset that expense, this gets added to the price of the shoes.

19. Harbor Fees and Taxes

When the ships with On Running shoes enter a harbor, it needs to be anchored there. For this, the port authorities charge taxes and fees from the companies.

This is a considerable amount of money and the company has to bear the cost. To compensate for that, this gets added to the shoe prices.

20. Packaging Cost

For the packaging of the shoes, there are different materials that are needed. For example, cardboard boxes, papers, other packing material, etc.

This is needed for each and every shoe that is manufactured by the company. So, you can imagine the kind of money that On Running spends on the packaging of these shoes.

This cost is also added to the price tag of the shoes and results in steeper prices for the On Cloud shoes.

21. Factory Running Cost

To produce running shoes on a mass scale, you need a factory. This can be owned by the company or can be delegated to a separate manufacturer.

However, in both cases, the company has to bear the factory running cost in one way or the other. If it is your own factory, then you have to bear the individual expenses of labor, utility, emergencies, etc.

If it is delegated to a manufacturer, it will be charged to you and included in the manufacturing cost of the shoes.

Whatever may be the case, this is an expense and has to be offset. This is done by adding it to the price tag of On Running shoes.

Madhusree Basu

Madhusree Basu

Author, Admin

Blogger and a fitness enthusiast. She loves running and Yoga and everything in between. She started running to manage her weight and to eat to her heart’s content. A true foodie at heart she shares whatever knowledge she has gained throughout the years about weight management and fitness.

Topo Phantom Vs Hoka Clifton: Which One Is The Best For You?

Topo Phantom Vs Hoka Clifton: Which One Is The Best For You?

[aff_disclosure]

Hoka Clifton and Topo Phantom are both neutral running shoes that have a lot of cushioning, lightness and comfort.

We are today comparing Hoka Clifton 8 and Topo Phantom 2 as these are the latest models of these two shoes currently.

In the sections below, I’ve tried to compare these two shoes in as much detail as possible. Hopefully, by the end of this post, you will be able to choose between Topo Phantom vs Hoka Clifton

Let’s proceed…

Topo Phantom Vs Hoka Clifton

This is our winner

Last update on 2024-06-12 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Topo Phantom 2

Why did we pick this one?

  • Maximal cushioning.
  • Lightweight.
  • Elegant style.
  • Good ankle stability.
  • Excellent durability.

Differences Between Topo Phantom Vs Hoka Clifton

  • Topo Phanton is heavier than Hoka Clifton. The women’s version of Topo Phanton weighs around 9.1oz or 258g whereas Hoka Clifton’s women’s version weighs around 8.0oz or 226.8g. Topo Phantom’s men’s version weighs around 10.4oz or 295g whereas that of Hoka Clifton’s weighs around 8.9oz or 252.3g.

  • The heel stack of Hoka Clifton (37mm) is higher than that of Topo Phantom (34mm) by 3mm.

  • The forefoot stack of Hoka Clifton (32mm) is higher than that of Topo Phantom (29mm) by 5mm.

  • Hoka Clifton has two toe-box widths available for both the women’s version and the men’s version whereas for Topo Phantom there is only one toe-box width available for both versions.

  • The latest generation of Hoka Clifton is 8 whereas the current generation of Topo Phantom is 2.

Topo Phantom Vs Hoka Clifton – An Overview

Hoka Clifton and Topo Phantom are neutral running shoes. Both of these shoes are very comfortable and shock-absorbing and will provide you with an excellent ride.

They have excellent breathability and stretch, and the outsole has a proper grip on both wet and dry surfaces. You have lesser chances of tripping and falling while wearing these shoes.

In the following sections, I’ll be providing you with an in-depth comparison of Hoka Clifton and Topo Phantom.

So, let’s proceed…

Topo Phantom Vs Hoka Clifton - Overview

Topo Phantom 2  Vs Hoka Clifton 8 – Features at a glance

Topo Phantom 2 Hoka Clifton 8
TOPO ATHLETIC PHANTOM 2 HOKA CLIFTON
Check Price!
Check Price!
Type Neutral Neutral
Heel-to-toe Drop 5mm 12mm
Weight

9.1oz / 258g (Women)

10.4oz / 295g (Men)

8.0oz / 226.8g (Women)

8.9oz / 252.3g (Men)

Arch Support Medium Medium
Midsole Type ZIP Foam CMEVA
Technology ZIP Foam, OrthoLite Footbed Breathable mesh, Early-stage meta rocker, Extended pull tab, CMEVA midsole
Sizes

4.0 – 9.0 (Women)

7.0 – 13.0 (Men)

5.0 – 12.0 (Women)

7.0 – 16.0 (Men)

Width

Medium (Women)

Medium (Men)

Medium (B), Wide (D) (Women)

Medium (D), Wide (EE) (Men)

Use Any Distances, Treadmill, Road Any Distances, Speed Run, Treadmill, Road
Editor’s Rating 4 and a half star-92X25-min 4 and a half star-92X25-min
Check Price!
Check Price!

PRODUCT

TOPO ATHLETIC PHANTOM 2

Topo Phantom 2

FEATURES

3YPE: Neutral

HEEL-TO-TOE DROP: 5mm

WEIGHT: 9.1oz / 258g (Women)/ 10.4oz / 295g (Men)

ARCH SUPPORT: Medium

MIDSOLE TYPE: ZIP Foam

TECHNOLOGY: ZIP Foam, OrthoLite Footbed

SIZES: 4.0 – 9.0 (Women) / 7.0 – 13.0 (Men)

WIDTH: Medium (Women) / Medium (Men)

USE: Any Distances, Treadmill, Road

EDITOR’S RATING

4 and a half star-92X25-min

PRODUCT

HOKA CLIFTON

Hoka Clifton 8

FEATURES

TYPE: Neutral

HEEL-TO-TOE DROP: 5mm

WEIGHT: 8.0oz/226.8g (Women) / 8.9oz/252.3g (Men)

ARCH SUPPORT: Medium

MIDSOLE TYPE: CMEVA

TECHNOLOGY: Breathable mesh, Early-stage meta rocker, Extended pull tab, CMEVA midsole

SIZES: 5.0 – 12.0 (Women) / 7.0 – 16.0 (Men)

WIDTH: Medium (B), Wide (D) (Women) / Medium (D), Wide (EE) (Men)

USE: Any Distances, Speed Run, Treadmill, Road

EDITOR’S RATING

4 and a half star-92X25-min

Hoka Clifton Vs. Topo Phantom – A head-to-head comparison

In the above sections, we have provided you with some basic differences and similarities between Topo Phantom and Hoka Clifton.

In the following sections, we will be providing you with more details about these two running shoes.

Outsole

Topo Athletic Phantom 2 Vs Hoka One One Clifton 8 - Outsole

The outsole of Topo Phantom is partly made of the exposed midsole and partly with the midsole covered by durable rubber.

If you observe the presence of the durable rubber on the outsole it is only present in the places where there will be more wear and tear.

It is not present in the other places and in those areas you will have a rubberized midsole which is actually the most part of the outsole.

Also, there are different patterns that are made on the outsole. Most of them are either vertical or horizontal. These are the flex groove patterns that make the outsole flexible.

If you didn’t have that the outsole of Topo Phantom would have been very stiff. Also, there are lug patterns that are present in the durable rubber area.

This improves the grip of the shoe. Also, in general, the rubber that is present in the outsole only improves the grip of the shoe.

The outsole of Hoka Clifton is also similar. It has durable rubber in the high wear and tear areas of the outsole.

For the rest of the places, it has a rubberized exposed midsole. Also, the exposed midsole also has a lot of patterns present.

The most important is what is present in the forefoot as this is related to the flexibility of the shoe. If you observe the forefoot of Hoka Clifton, you will find the durable rubber and the midsole is placed parallelly at an angle and in an alternating pattern.

This actually improves flexibility. If the entire area was covered with rubber then the firmness of the sole would have been too much.

Also, due to the presence of durable rubber in high wear and tear-prone areas, improves the overall lifespan of the shoe.

Midsole

Hoka Clifton Vs Topo Phantom - Midsole
The midsole of Topo Phantom is made from ZIP Foam. This is a lightweight foam that is cushy, comfortable, and responsive. Topo Phantom is already a maximally cushioned running shoe and with Phantom 2, the level of cushioning has increased. Topo Phantom 2 has 3mm more cushioning which makes it, even more, cushier and more comfortable. This is a low-drop running shoe and has a heel-to-toe drop of 5mm. The heel stack of Topo Phantom is around 34mm whereas the forefoot is around 29mm. This is a good shoe for any kind of running especially the long-distance ones. However, I’ll not take them for the speed workout. On the other hand, Hoka Clifton‘s midsole is made from CMEVA. This is compression-molded EVA foam that provides you with exceptional cushioning. Hoka Clifton is not a maximally cushioned running shoe. Instead, it has balanced cushioning which means, it is a mix of responsiveness and cushioning and you can feel the difference when you wear both of these shoes. One of them feels like a pillowy cushion whereas Hoka Clifton feels a lot snappier. The heel-to-toe drop of Hoka Clifton is also 5mm, however, the stack height is different. The forefoot stack is around 32mm and the heel stack is around 37mm. Although the stack height of both the forefoot and the rearfoot is more than that of Topo Phantom, due to the nature of the materials used in these shoes Hoka Clifton feels snappier.

Upper

Topo Phantom 2 Vs Hoka Clifton 8 - Upper

The upper of Topo Phantom is made of engineered mesh. This is an overlay-free mesh and is very breathable.

Like many other companies, Topo is also shifting towards a more eco-friendly line of products. Topo phantom is one of them.

It has 30% recycled material in its upper. This helps Topo to be more environmentally friendly and reduces its overall carbon footprint.

Unlike Hoka, Topo is still going with the more traditional look for its running shoes and doesn’t have an extended pull tab.

However, the collar that it has is well padded and will provide you with a good amount of comfort.

Combined with the padded tongue, it will provide your ankle with more stability and you will have fewer chances of twisting your ankles.

Also, it has a padded insole that provides you with step-in comfort and good arch support. The external TPU heel keeps your feet firmly grounded on the platform and you will not have to deal with heel slips or such things.

Like Hoka Clifton, Topo Phantom also has flat laces which remain tied while you run.

What I don’t like about Phantom is its look. It looks bulky and not at all stylish. It is very comfortable however, it doesn’t get a lot of points in the looks department.

Also, another thing that I don’t like about this shoe is that it is not available in wide fit. People who have wider foot requirements will not be able to use it.

Like Topo Phantom, Hoka Clifton also has an engineered mesh upper. Also, like Topo Phantom, it is made from recycled material.

This mesh is durable, breathable, and provides you with excellent comfort. It stretches where and when required and still maintains its structure.

The collar area has an extended pull tab for the easy wearing of the shoe. This collar is also decently padded for providing more ankle and Achilles support.

Also, the tongue is anatomically designed and provides you with additional ankle support.

Like Topo Phantom, Hoka Clifton also has flat laces. These laces don’t come undone when you are running.

Also, the inside of the shoe is very smooth and doesn’t rub against your skin. This is important because such friction can create blisters.

I find Hoka Clifton‘s look to be very stylish and it is also available in multiple widths for both genders. This is great for runners like me who have bunions.

Weight

Hoka Clifton is lighter than Topo Phantom for both versions. It is understandable as Topo Athletic Phantom is a maximally cushioned running shoe and Hoka Clifton has a balanced cushioning.

Topo Phantom weighs around 9.1oz /258g for women and 10.4oz/295g for men.

Hoka Clifton weighs around 8.0oz/226.8g for women and 8.9oz/252.3g for men.

Price

The price of Hoka Clifton and Topo Phantom is almost similar. If you check the price difference between the current versions of Clifton and Phantom, you will find a difference of $0.05 or 5 cents.

This difference is negligible and will not affect your decision to pick the one more suitable for you. Also, since the drop of both of these shoes is also the same, this also will not help you decide on the same.

So, I would suggest that you try on both of these shoes and find out which feels more comfortable to you. Some, love the plush cushioning and the others will like the responsiveness.

Based on your comfort and preference pick the shoe for you.

In the above sections, we have tried to provide you with all the differences and similarities between Topo Phantom and Hoka Clifton.

However, we have provided some alternatives to these two running shoes in the below sections. Check them out.

Similar Shoes

Running Shoes Similar To Topo Athletic Phantom 2

Topo Athletic Phantom is a maximal cushioned running shoe. It is excellent with shock absorption and will provide you with a very cushy experience. Also, it is a low-drop running shoe.

A running shoe that will provide you with a similar experience is Hoka Bondi. It is also a maximal cushioned running shoe with a low heel-to-toe drop. Running in Bondi feels like running on the clouds.

Hoka Bondi 7
1,405 Reviews
Hoka Bondi 7
  • Open mesh construction
  • Memory foam collar
  • Refined early stage Meta-Rocker

Last update on 2024-06-13 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Running Shoes Similar To Hoka One One Clifton 8

Hoka Clifton is a lightweight running shoe. It is responsive and will provide you with a cushy ride. It is good for even longer distances.

A running shoe that can provide you with a similar experience is Brooks Trace. It is a lightweight running shoe that will provide you with good responsiveness while providing a good amount of cushioning.

Brooks Trace Running Shoes
  • THIS MEN'S SHOE IS FOR: The Trace is a perfect choice for runners who want a performance running shoe — but not necessarily all the bells and whistles.
  • NEUTRAL SUPPORT: The Trace offers neutral support combined with dynamic cushioning throughout, to minimize the impact of your every step while delivering a smooth ride from start to finish.
  • ADAPTIVE CUSHIONING: Lightweight BioMoGo DNA adapts to your speed, stride, and weight to help deflect impact away from your body.

Last update on 2024-06-13 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Conclusion

In the above sections, I have tried to cover almost all the differences and similarities between Hoka Clifton Vs Topo Phantom. However, we liked Topo Phantom a bit more than Hoka Clifton.

Almost everything in Topo Phantom is comparable to Hoka Clifton. However, the amount of cushioning that Topo Phantom has is way more than Hoka Clifton. This is the reason why we chose Topo Phantom over Hoka Clifton.

Topo Phantom Vs Hoka Clifton Running Shoes Pin
Madhusree Basu

Madhusree Basu

Author, Admin

Blogger and a fitness enthusiast. She loves running and Yoga and everything in between. She started running to manage her weight and to eat to her heart’s content. A true foodie at heart she shares whatever knowledge she has gained throughout the years about weight management and fitness.

Salomon Vs Nike Sizing: How Different Are They?

Salomon Vs Nike Sizing: How Different Are They?

Salomon and Nike are two very popular brands of running shoes.

Actually, to say that they only produce running shoes is a bit of an understatement. Both of them produce a lot of other products with Salomon having a fair share of other outdoor equipment.

We will cover that in a future post when we compare the brands as a whole. However, since this post is related to the sizing of Salomon vs Nike, we will focus on that. More specifically on the running footwear that they produce.

There are a lot of similarities between these two brands related to running shoe sizing, but there are a whole lot of differences as well.

Also, before proceeding further, I would like to tell you that, I’ll not be comparing the heel-to-toe drop of Salomon and Nike with each other as I’ve already covered that in this article.

Let’s proceed…

Related: Do Hokas Run Big, Small, Or True To Size?

Asics Gel Kayano Vs Nike Pegasus: Which One Is The Best For You?

Salomon Vs Nike Sizing

Salmon Vs Nike Sizing: Differences

1. For Nike women’s size starts from 21cm(8.27 in)/4(US)/1.5(UK)/34.5(EU). For Nike women’s size starts from 22cm (8.66 in)/5(US)/3.5(UK)/36(EU).

2. For Salomon men’s size starts from 22cm (8.5 in)/4(US)/3.5(UK)/36(EU). For Nike men’s size starts from 22.5cm (8.86 in)/3.5(US)/3(UK)/35.5(EU).

3. Some of the sizes of Salomon for EU region are represented with fractions like 1/3, 2/3 etc. whereas for Nike it is represented in an increment of 0.5 for the EU region.

4. For some of the sizes from Nike there is a double number representation like 4.5/5 for all the regions. Such a thing is not present in Salomon.

5. For women’s shoes Nike has more sizes than Salomon for smaller pairs and larger pairs as well.

6. For men’s shoes, Salomon has one more smaller size than Nike. However, for the larger pairs, there are many more sizes available in Nike than Salomon.

7. The numbers representing the same lengths of the shoes are completely different for both the brands and you will not be able to relate to it directly.

Related: 10 Best 5mm Drop Running Shoes

Salomon Vs Nike Sizing: Women’s Shoes (cm, inches)

cm (inches)

Salomon (US)

Nike (US)

Salomon (UK)

Nike (UK)

Salomon (EU)

Nike (EU)

21 cm

(8.27 in)

-

4

-

1.5

-

34.5

21.5 cm

(8.46 in)

-

4.5

-

2

-

35

22 cm

(8.66 in)

5

5

3.5

2.5

36

35.5

22.5 cm

(8.85 in)

5.5

5.5

4

3

36 2/3

36

23 cm

(9.05 in)

6

6

4.5

3.5

37 1/3

36.5

23.5 cm

(9.25 in)

6.5

6.7

5

4

38

37.5

24 cm

(9.45 in)

7

7

5.5

4.5

38 2/3

38

24.5 cm

(9.65 in)

7.5

7.5

6

5

39 1/3

38.5

25 cm

(9.85 in)

8

8

6.5

5.5

40

39

25.5 cm

(10.03 in)

8.5

8.5

7

6

40 2/3

40

26 cm

(10.24 in)

9

9

7.5

6.5

41 1/3

40.5

26.5 cm

(10.43 in)

9.5

9.5

8

7

42

41

27 cm

(10.63 in)

10

10

8.5

7.5

42 2/3

42

27.5 cm

(10.83 in)

10.5

10.5

9

8

43 1/3

42.5

28 cm

(11.03 in)

11

11

9.5

8.5

44

43

28.5 cm

(11.23 in)

11.5

11.5

10

9

44 2/3

44

29 cm

(11.03 in)

12

12

10.5

9.5

45 1/3

44.5

29.5 cm

(11.23 in)

12.5

12.5

11

10

46

45

30 cm

(12.03 in)

13

13

11.5

10.5

46 2/3

45.5

30.5 cm

(12.23 in)

13.5

13.5

12

11

47 1/3

46

31 cm

(12.43 in)

14

14

12.5

11.5

48

47

31.5 cm

(12.63 in)

14.5

14.5

13

12

48 2/3

47.5

32 cm

(12.83 in)

15

15

13.5

12.5

49 1/3

48

32.5 cm

(13.03 in)

15.5

15.5

14

13

50

48.5

33 cm

(13.23 in)

16

16

14.5

13.5

50 2/3

49

33.5 cm

(13.43 in)

-

16.5

-

14

-

50

34 cm

(13.63 in)

-

17

-

14.5

-

50.5

34.5 cm

(13.83 in)

-

17.5

-

15

-

51

35 cm

(14.03 in)

-

18

-

15.5

-

51.5

35.5 cm

(14.23 in)

-

18.5

-

16

-

52

36 cm

(14.43 in)

-

19

-

16.5

-

52.5

36.5 cm

(14.63 in)

-

19.5

-

17

-

53

37 cm

(14.83 in)

-

20

-

17.5

-

53.5

37.5 cm

(15.03 in)

-

20.5

-

18

-

54

38 cm

(15.23 in)

-

21

-

18.5

-

54.5

38.5 cm

(15.43 in)

-

21.5

-

19

-

55

39 cm

(15.63 in)

-

22

-

19.5

-

55.5

39.5 cm

(15.83 in)

-

22.5

-

20

-

56

Download Salomon Vs Nike Size Chart For Women

Related: Topo Vs Altra Sizing Chart: How Different Are They?

Nike Vs Salomon Sizing: Men’s Shoes (cm, inches)

cm (inches)

Salomon (US)

Nike (US)

Salomon (UK)

Nike (UK)

Salomon (EU)

Nike (EU)

22cm

(8.5 in)

4

-

3.5

-

36

-

22.5cm

(8.86 in)

4.5

3.5

4

3

36 2/3

35.5

23cm

(9.05 in)

5

4

4.5

3.5

37 1/3

36

23.5cm

(9.25 in)

5.5

4.5/5

5

4/4.5

38

36.5/37.5

24cm

(9.45 in)

6

5/5.5

5.5

5.5/6

38.5

38/38.5

24.5cm

(9.64 in)

6.5

6.5

6

6

38 2/3

39

25 cm

(9.84 in)

7

7

6.5

6

39 1/3

40

25.5 cm

(10.04 in)

7.5

7.5

7

6.5

40

40.5

26 cm

(10.24 in)

8

8

7.5

7

40 2/3

41

26.5 cm

(10.43 in)

8.5

8

8

7.5

41 1/3

42

27 cm

(10.63 in)

9

8.5

8

42

42.5

27.5 cm

(10.83 in)

9.5

9.5

9

8.5

42 2/3

43

28 cm

(11.02 in)

10

10

9.5

9

43 1/3

44

28.5 cm

(11.22 in)

10.5

10.5

10

9.5

44

44.5

29 cm

(11.42 in)

11

11

10.5

10

44 2/3

45

29.5 cm

(11.61 in)

11.5

11.5

11

10.5

45 1/3

45.5

30 cm

(11.81 in)

12

12

11.5

11

46

46

30.5 cm

(12 in)

12.5

12.5

12

11.5

46 2/3

47

31 cm

(12.20 in)

13

13

12.5

12

47 1/3

47.5

31.5 cm

(12.40 in)

13.5

13.5

13

12.5

48

48

32 cm

(12.60 in)

14

14

13.5

13

48 2/3

48.5

32.5 cm

(12.80 in)

14.5

14.5

14

13.5

49 1/3

49

33 cm

(13.0 in)

15

15

14.5

14

50

49.5

33.5 cm

(13.2 in)

-

15.5

-

14.5

50 2/3

50

34 cm

(13.38 in)

-

16

-

15

-

50.5

34.5 cm

(13.58 in)

-

16.5

-

15.5

-

51

35 cm

(13.78 in)

-

17

-

16

-

51.5

35.5 cm

(13.98 in)

-

17.5

-

16.5

-

52

36 cm

(14.17 in)

-

18

-

17

-

52.5

36.5 cm

(14.37 in)

-

18.5

-

17.5

-

53

37 cm

(14.57 in)

-

19

-

18

-

53.5

37.5 cm

(14.76 in)

-

19.5

-

18.5

-

54

38 cm

(14.96 in)

-

20

-

19

-

54.5

38.5 cm

(15.16 in)

-

20.5

-

19.5

-

55

39 cm

(15.35 in)

-

21

-

20

-

55.5

39.5 cm

(15.55 in)

-

21.5

-

20.5

-

56

40 cm

(15.75 in)

-

22

-

21

-

56.5

Download Nike size compared to Salomon (Men)

Related: New Balance Size Chart Vs Nike

Saucony Vs Asics Sizing Chart: How Are They Different?

Related: Top 15 Best Running Shoes for Morton’s Neuroma Reviewed

Do Nike Run Bigger Or Smaller Than Salomon?

No Nike doesn’t run bigger or smaller than Salomon. The lengths in cm or inches that are present in Salomon are also present in Nike barring a few which lengths are not available in either of the brands.

However, if you try to equate the lengths based on the different numbers other that are used for shoe size representation, then you will have a hard time.

Of all the size comparisons that I’ve done, I’ve not seen so much of number variations between the two brands.

Only a handful of the numbers match with each other for both the brands and the rest are all different.

Also, you cannot apply generalized rules for those numbers as well…They vary so much that I cannot even tell that, from this number to this number Salomon is leading or Nike is leading…or something similar…

So, as always, I’ll tell you to check the shoe length in a more universal unit like cm or inches that way you will be able to avoid this numbering confusion.

Madhusree Basu

Madhusree Basu

Author, Admin

Blogger and a fitness enthusiast. She loves running and Yoga and everything in between. She started running to manage her weight and to eat to her heart’s content. A true foodie at heart she shares whatever knowledge she has gained throughout the years about weight management and fitness.

Hoka Vs Nike: Which Brand Is Right For You?

Hoka Vs Nike: Which Brand Is Right For You?

Hoka Vs Nike is tough to compare as a brand. Both produce two very different kinds of shoes and both are very popular brands.

We found it very hard to compare Nike and Hoka…but nonetheless we tried to do justice with this comparison.

Below we have compared them in as much detail as possible so that you can choose the right brand for you…let’s find out, which one we prefer…Nike or Hoka…

Hoka Vs Nike

Hoka Vs Nike: Differences

1. The maximum drop of a Hoka shoe is 6mm whereas the maximum drop of a Nike shoe is 10mm.

2. Nike produces more types of sports shoes, however, Hoka also has orthopedic shoes and recovery sandals which Nike doesn’t have.

3. Nike manufactures from caps to sweatshirts to modest wear, whereas Hoka only has shorts, tops, and leggings.

4. Nike has 3 trail-running models and around 48 road running models of shoes, whereas Hoka has 12 trail-running models and 20 road-running models of shoes.

5. Between Hoka and Nike, surprisingly Nike has the most maximally cushioned shoes.

6. Nike has a toe spring and flex grooves in the forefoot for easier heel-to-toe movement, whereas Hoka uses rocker technology.

7. In general, Hoka cushioning feels slightly softer than Nike midsoles.

8. Nike has more models of running shoes than Hoka combining both road running and trail running shoes.

9. Nike looks edgier than Hoka, who has a more bulky appearance.

10. Nike has a pointed toe box, whereas Hoka generally has a more roundish toe box.

Related: ON Running Vs Nike Sizing: Differences And Similarities

Hoka and Nike: Similarities

  • The minimum drop of both Hoka and Nike is 4mm.
  • Both Nike and Hoka are shifting towards eco-friendly and sustainable materials.
  • Both manufacture sports apparel.
  • Both have running shoes in the maximal cushioning category.
  • Both manufacture running shoes for trails and roads.
  • Both the brands have a non-restrictive fit.
  • Both use engineered mesh in the upper of their running shoes.
  • Both use a foam material that is a derivative of EVA foam.
  • Both have some models which have a carbon fiber plate.
  • Both are available in India.

Related: Saucony Vs Asics Sizing Chart: How Are They Different?

Shoe Construction

Hoka and Nike is both very popular brands for running shoes. However, Hoka is a comparatively newer entry into the running shoe horizon.

Hoka was founded in 2009 whereas Nike has been around since 1964.

However, that doesn’t change the way these shoes feel on your feet. Hoka throughout the years has done a lot of innovations and is currently dominating the lower drop segment in the market.

Nike on the other hand needs no introduction even outside the US. This may be one of the most loved brands throughout the world.

And as per construction, both of them make world-class running shoes that are great for excellent performance and cushioning.

Both the brands support multiple types of runners and multiple types of runs. Now let’s see how each of their components measures up to each other.

Related: Brooks Vs Saucony Vs Hoka: Which Brand Is Right For You?

Midsole

The midsole of the running shoe is the main source of comfort and performance for a runner. Hoka and Nike both have gone above and beyond with innovation to provide you with the right cushioning for just your need…

Hoka heavily uses CMEVA or Compression-Molded EVA foam. It is created from EVA foam and retains it comfort and cushioning.

Nike has different types of midsoles that are used in different models. One of the primary cushioning materials from Nike is the Air Zoom material. You can think of them as pockets filled with air in between stretched materials.

When you apply pressure on that unit, it compresses, and with the release of pressure, it bounces back to the original shape. This provides you with exceptional cushioning and shock absorption.

In general, these units are present throughout the length of the sole or in the heel region for that added shock absorption.

Also, most of the running shoes from Hoka use meta rocker technology which has two distinct categories…the early-stage meta rocker and the late-stage meta rocker.

The position of the transition zone decided the type of meta rocker that is used. If it is behind the metatarsals, then it is an early-stage meta rocker. If the transition zone is in front of the metatarsals, it is the late-stage meta-rocker. The late stage provides a more stable midfoot.

You will be able to find this rocker technology in Nike as well. This is most common in shoes that have ZoomX cushioning. As with Hoka, this technology from Nike also has a similar function. It helps in easier heel-to-transition.

ZoomX is one of the most, if not the lightest, softest, and most responsive midsole materials from Nike. Apart from being one of the cushiest materials from Nike, ZoomX also has a unidirectional carbon fiber plate.

This enhances the responsiveness of the sole and provides you with better performance.

Apart from ZoomX, Nike also has React foam. As you might be aware, this foam debuted in 2017 for basketball shoes and within a year, Nike adapted it for its running shoes.

This is a cushioning which is a blend of soft cushiness and excellent energy return, which is often mutually exclusive. React cushioning has significant energy return and provides you excellent cushioning while simultaneously being lightweight.

Also, this foam is very durable and will not lose shape easily.

Another type of cushioning that you will frequently see in the lower-priced shoes from Nike is the Cushlon foam. This is a soft foam that is good with cushioning and responsiveness. It feels soft under the foot and is good for everyday runs.

I would not recommend Cushlon for longer distances, but for shorter distances and training, they are excellent cushioning material.

For stability Hoka uses J-Frame. This helps runners with overpronation. It is basically a firmer foam on the medial side in the shape of a J.

Nike uses a supportive medial post for stability. This is a dual-density foam handle overpronation and helps runners who need more support.

For Hoka, there is another H-Frame technology that comes into play in some shoes like Gaviota. The midfoot H-Frame provides you with increased upper support and also locks down the midfoot.

I would vote that comfort-wise, Hoka and Nike are almost at par. However, I’ve always found Nike to be a bit stiffer than my liking. Being said that, cushions, Nike does a fabulous job and so does Hoka.

So, to decide between the two, the only choice you have is to try them on. Choose the one wearing which you feel more comfortable. It need not have to be super-soft if that is not your preference. Choose something that you like and will serve your purpose.

Also, this may be the appropriate place to mention that, Hoka dominates the low heel drop segment. The highest drop that is available from Hoka is 6mm, so, decide accordingly.

If you need a running shoe with a higher drop, then look into the models from Nike as the drop here goes up to 10mm.

Outsole

The outsole of Hoka is mostly made of durable rubber. This type of rubber is highly abrasion resistant and will last for a long time.

Also, the grip on both wet and dry surfaces of these outsoles is also good. You have fewer chances of tripping, slipping, or falling.

However, if you are thinking of a full-blown outsole covering the entire outer surface of the midsole, then you are mistaken.

Hoka uses, what can be dest described as rubber stips on the high wear and tear prone areas. This reinforces those areas and improves durability.

With Hoka, you will find another variation in the outsole and it is the rubberized EVA. In this type, what Hoka does is make the outer surface of the midsole rubberized.

This way they saved up on the rubber strips of durable rubber and simultaneously lighten the overall weight of the shoe.

However, I felt that the durably of such shoes are slightly less than that of the rubber sole shoes. Hoka also uses this similar method for the exposed areas of the midsole in-between rubber-covered areas.

With Nike, the usage of durable rubber on the outsole is more. However, you can still find rubberized foam in the less-premium models from Nike.

The outsole design of Nike is generated through a computer and provides you with a precise groove and flex pattern. The input of this design is based on the inputs from thousand of athletes and this provides you with a running outsole that is durable, grippy, and provides slightly added cushioning.

There are various patterns that you will be able to find on the outsole of the shoes from Nike and one of them is the waffle pattern that is present at the forefoot of Nike models like Pegasus.

On landing, they distribute the load and also grip the ground firmly. This way it acts as a cushioning material as well.

Although the rubber is distributed throughout the outsole, it is not a continuous piece of rubber. This ensures that the running shoe has optimal flexibility and doesn’t add additional stiffness to the sole. This is because the inherent nature of durable rubber is stiffness.

The other thing that Nike uses to improve the flexibility of the shoe is the addition of flex grooves on the forefoot. This is not present in all the models from Nike, but some of the popular models like Flex Experience Run have this feature. Also, this is a method that Nike uses and you will not find it in Hoka.

The main reason to have that is to help in easier heel-to-toe transition which is handled by Hoka using its meta rocker technology.

This is an alternate technology that Nike uses to improve the heel-to-toe transition. Also, the shoes from Nike that uses rocker technology don’t have these flex grooves for obvious reasons.

This is what is used in the outsole of road running shoes. For trail runners, both companies use aggressive lugs that may be unidirectional or multidirectional.

Nike shoes have tapering lugs that easily get embedded in the trails, providing you with a lot more stability while running on them.

Is there any difference when you run in either of these shoes?

Grip-wise you won’t be able to tell much. They grip the roads or the trails pretty well and are excellent to provide durability to these shoes.

Upper

Hoka and Nike both uses engineered mesh on the upper for durability, support, and to keep the runner’s feet secured.

In Hoka, there are mainly two types of meshed…one is the engineered mesh and the other is engineered jacquard mesh.

In Jacquard mesh, complex designs are directly knitted in the mesh whereas, in engineered mesh, such a thing is not there…

For example, the upper of Mach Supersonic is jacquard mesh whereas Bondi is open engineered mesh.

With both types of meshes, you will not have issues with breathability…however, a jacquard mesh appears to be thicker and denser.

Hoka has started transitioning to a more sustainable way of production and is using a lot of recycled materials in its shoes.

A similar thing can be observed in Nike as well and one such initiative is to replace their double-layered cardboard boxes with single-layer boxes and to make that box with 90% recycled materials.

Most of the upper of Hoka shoes have TPU overlays…these overlays are used to reinforce the midfoot structure of the shoes.

The tongue in the models of Hoka is made from engineered mesh and has nice padding. They are anatomically designed and are great with breathability.

Also, the tongue may be gusseted/integrated or non-gusseted/free…Since the design of the tongues is anatomical, they will rarely move even if they are free.

Hoka is also transitioning to include that extended pull tab in its models.  Some of the models like Bondi or Arahi still have the traditional lace pull tab at the back of the heel.

However, the likes of Clifton or Mach have already included that in the upper and now provide additional support to the Achilles area plus. This has also made it easy to put on these shoes.

The heel counter of Hoka shoes are well constructed and locks your heel in. This doesn’t allow your heels to move around for any unforeseen accidents and/or create blisters.

These Hoka Shoes have a sockliner which is from OrthoLite and most of them are removable. These are molded EVA sockliner and provide you with comfort and proper arch support.

Nike uses a couple of technologies when it comes to the upper, however, it boils down to a primary type of mesh which is the engineered mesh.

Unlike Hoka, Nike has not yet adopted jacquard mesh and it doesn’t seem that they will adopt that in the future.

However, with engineered mesh they use two primary kinds…one is the Fresh knit that you will find in shoes like Flex Experience Run and Flyknit that you will find in shoes like Pegasus.

Flyknit is a more premium upper which is manufactured from strong yet lightweight yarn. It is woven into a single-piece upper to avoid unnecessary stitching.

With Flyknit another thing that comes into the picture is the Flywire cables. They are present in the lace area and provide additional midfoot stability. They also secure the midfoot.

Many of the models of Nike have adopted that extended pull tab feature which is excellent for easily wearing this shoe.

Also, the tongue that is present in most of the models has a padded tongue. This is a key thing for comfort as it will keep you comfortable while running.

The tongue of Nike models may be gusseted or non-gusseted depending on the models and will provide you with excellent comfort.

The laces of all the models of Nike now have a flat lace. This helps to keep them remain tied while running. Although this should have been the case ideally, for some of the models (I personally own a Nike Air Zoom Structure), they tend to come untied while running.

Related: 10 Best Walking Shoes For Blister Prone Feet (Highly Rated)

Other Considerations

Hoka and Nike both produce running shoes that are very well made. Both the brands produce running shoes whose most models are true to size. However, if you try to draw parallels to the sizing, then you may have a bit of difficulty as the way they represent sizing is a bit different.

But you can still co-relate that using the length of the shoes either represented in cm or inches.

As we know, Hoka only produces running shoes that are low drop. However, Nike covers a wider range of drops and some of them belong to the category of high heel drops.

Related: 10 Best Running Shoes With High Heel Drop (12mm-15mm)

Durability

Hoka shoes may last you around 350 miles. Although, how long they will last will depend on how careful you are with the shoes and how you are using them.

With any highly cushioned running shoe, this is common and this doesn’t come as a surprise. Anything which lasts for 300-500 miles is considered good durability and Hoka is right in the ballpark of that.

Nike on the other hand lasts a bit lesser and according to Nike quality engineers, an average Nike shoe lasts for 200-300 miles. Of course, that changes from shoe to shoe and the usage, but that is how it is…

This is a bit surprising as I expected that due to the maximal nature of Hoka, they may last lesser than Nike. However, other than this, these shoes are considered at par.

Related: Topo Vs Altra Sizing Chart: How Different Are They?

Cushioning

The main cushioning material of Hoka is CMEVA. This is a cushy material and will provide you with exceptional impact resistance and is great for running longer distances.

They have included different technologies together to provide you with an excellent running experience.

The main material for cushioning in Nike running shoes is Zoom or Air Zoom. In some cases, they use Cushlon foam also. All these materials are a derivative of EVA foam and are combined with some specific technologies to make it even more comfortable.

Comfort-wise, I’ll consider both of these brands at par.

Related: Asics Gel Kayano Vs Nike Pegasus: Which One Is The Best For You?

Hoka Bondi Vs Clifton – Which Hoka Is Best For Your Feet?

Overall Fit And Comfort

The overall fit of Hoka is a bit widish. It will not be comfortable for most of the runners. However, one big limitation with Hoka is that, apart from the most popular models, the rest of them are not available in wide fit.

A similar thing exists with Nike as well. Apart from a couple of models, Nike is not available in wide fit.

This is bit of a problem for the runners who need a wider fit. Also, it may be only my perception, but I find Nike’s fit a bit snugger than a Hoka…but it is there…

Pricing

The starting price of Nike road running shoes is around $40 and in the range between $40 to $100, you get many models. You will also get the Nike Juniper Trail which is a trail running shoe.

However, with Hoka, the starting price of their road running range is around $130. You will not find a road running shoe in the $50-$100 range.

So, if you want to switch to Hoka from Nike, then depending on the model of Nike that you use, the price jump can be rather stiff.

However, if you are using something that is a more premium model from Nike, then the price point may match that of Hoka.

Actually, there are some models of Nike that costs way more than the most premium shoe from Hoka like Nike Zoom Alphafly Next Nature.

So, price-wise, Nike as a brand provides a much wider range than Hoka and for that matter has a lot more models than Hoka as well.

Conclusion

If you compare Nike Vs Hoka, both the brands are very similar in a lot of ways.

If one scores one point in some aspect, the other takes leads in some other category. Also, while comparing, I came to realize that some of the shortcomings that Hoka has are also present in Nike and vice versa.

Overall, both are excellent running shoe brands and will serve you well. However, which one will suit you will be completely dependent on your preference.

Madhusree Basu

Madhusree Basu

Author, Admin

Blogger and a fitness enthusiast. She loves running and Yoga and everything in between. She started running to manage her weight and to eat to her heart’s content. A true foodie at heart she shares whatever knowledge she has gained throughout the years about weight management and fitness.