Hoka Vs Nike: Which Brand Is Right For You?

Hoka Vs Nike: Which Brand Is Right For You?

Hoka Vs Nike is tough to compare as a brand. Both produce two very different kinds of shoes and both are very popular brands.

We found it very hard to compare Nike and Hoka…but nonetheless we tried to do justice with this comparison.

Below we have compared them in as much detail as possible so that you can choose the right brand for you…let’s find out, which one we prefer…Nike or Hoka…

Hoka Vs Nike

Hoka Vs Nike: Differences

1. The maximum drop of a Hoka shoe is 6mm whereas the maximum drop of a Nike shoe is 10mm.

2. Nike produces more types of sports shoes, however, Hoka also has orthopedic shoes and recovery sandals which Nike doesn’t have.

3. Nike manufactures from caps to sweatshirts to modest wear, whereas Hoka only has shorts, tops, and leggings.

4. Nike has 3 trail-running models and around 48 road running models of shoes, whereas Hoka has 12 trail-running models and 20 road-running models of shoes.

5. Between Hoka and Nike, surprisingly Nike has the most maximally cushioned shoes.

6. Nike has a toe spring and flex grooves in the forefoot for easier heel-to-toe movement, whereas Hoka uses rocker technology.

7. In general, Hoka cushioning feels slightly softer than Nike midsoles.

8. Nike has more models of running shoes than Hoka combining both road running and trail running shoes.

9. Nike looks edgier than Hoka, who has a more bulky appearance.

10. Nike has a pointed toe box, whereas Hoka generally has a more roundish toe box.

Hoka and Nike: Similarities

  • The minimum drop of both Hoka and Nike is 4mm.
  • Both Nike and Hoka are shifting towards eco-friendly and sustainable materials.
  • Both manufacture sports apparel.
  • Both have running shoes in the maximal cushioning category.
  • Both manufacture running shoes for trails and roads.
  • Both the brands have a non-restrictive fit.
  • Both use engineered mesh in the upper of their running shoes.
  • Both use a foam material that is a derivative of EVA foam.
  • Both have some models which have a carbon fiber plate.
  • Both are available in India.

Related: Saucony Vs Asics Sizing Chart: How Are They Different?

Shoe Construction

Hoka and Nike is both very popular brands for running shoes. However, Hoka is a comparatively newer entry into the running shoe horizon.

Hoka was founded in 2009 whereas Nike has been around since 1964.

However, that doesn’t change the way these shoes feel on your feet. Hoka throughout the years has done a lot of innovations and is currently dominating the lower drop segment in the market.

Nike on the other hand needs no introduction even outside the US. This may be one of the most loved brands throughout the world.

And as per construction, both of them make world-class running shoes that are great for excellent performance and cushioning.

Both the brands support multiple types of runners and multiple types of runs. Now let’s see how each of their components measures up to each other.

Related: Brooks Vs Saucony Vs Hoka: Which Brand Is Right For You?

Midsole

The midsole of the running shoe is the main source of comfort and performance for a runner. Hoka and Nike both have gone above and beyond with innovation to provide you with the right cushioning for just your need…

Hoka heavily uses CMEVA or Compression-Molded EVA foam. It is created from EVA foam and retains it comfort and cushioning.

Nike has different types of midsoles that are used in different models. One of the primary cushioning materials from Nike is the Air Zoom material. You can think of them as pockets filled with air in between stretched materials.

When you apply pressure on that unit, it compresses, and with the release of pressure, it bounces back to the original shape. This provides you with exceptional cushioning and shock absorption.

In general, these units are present throughout the length of the sole or in the heel region for that added shock absorption.

Also, most of the running shoes from Hoka use meta rocker technology which has two distinct categories…the early-stage meta rocker and the late-stage meta rocker.

The position of the transition zone decided the type of meta rocker that is used. If it is behind the metatarsals, then it is an early-stage meta rocker. If the transition zone is in front of the metatarsals, it is the late-stage meta-rocker. The late stage provides a more stable midfoot.

You will be able to find this rocker technology in Nike as well. This is most common in shoes that have ZoomX cushioning. As with Hoka, this technology from Nike also has a similar function. It helps in easier heel-to-transition.

ZoomX is one of the most, if not the lightest, softest, and most responsive midsole materials from Nike. Apart from being one of the cushiest materials from Nike, ZoomX also has a unidirectional carbon fiber plate.

This enhances the responsiveness of the sole and provides you with better performance.

Apart from ZoomX, Nike also has React foam. As you might be aware, this foam debuted in 2017 for basketball shoes and within a year, Nike adapted it for its running shoes.

This is a cushioning which is a blend of soft cushiness and excellent energy return, which is often mutually exclusive. React cushioning has significant energy return and provides you excellent cushioning while simultaneously being lightweight.

Also, this foam is very durable and will not lose shape easily.

Another type of cushioning that you will frequently see in the lower-priced shoes from Nike is the Cushlon foam. This is a soft foam that is good with cushioning and responsiveness. It feels soft under the foot and is good for everyday runs.

I would not recommend Cushlon for longer distances, but for shorter distances and training, they are excellent cushioning material.

For stability Hoka uses J-Frame. This helps runners with overpronation. It is basically a firmer foam on the medial side in the shape of a J.

Nike uses a supportive medial post for stability. This is a dual-density foam handle overpronation and helps runners who need more support.

For Hoka, there is another H-Frame technology that comes into play in some shoes like Gaviota. The midfoot H-Frame provides you with increased upper support and also locks down the midfoot.

I would vote that comfort-wise, Hoka and Nike are almost at par. However, I’ve always found Nike to be a bit stiffer than my liking. Being said that, cushions, Nike does a fabulous job and so does Hoka.

So, to decide between the two, the only choice you have is to try them on. Choose the one wearing which you feel more comfortable. It need not have to be super-soft if that is not your preference. Choose something that you like and will serve your purpose.

Also, this may be the appropriate place to mention that, Hoka dominates the low heel drop segment. The highest drop that is available from Hoka is 6mm, so, decide accordingly.

If you need a running shoe with a higher drop, then look into the models from Nike as the drop here goes up to 10mm.

Outsole

The outsole of Hoka is mostly made of durable rubber. This type of rubber is highly abrasion resistant and will last for a long time.

Also, the grip on both wet and dry surfaces of these outsoles is also good. You have fewer chances of tripping, slipping, or falling.

However, if you are thinking of a full-blown outsole covering the entire outer surface of the midsole, then you are mistaken.

Hoka uses, what can be dest described as rubber stips on the high wear and tear prone areas. This reinforces those areas and improves durability.

With Hoka, you will find another variation in the outsole and it is the rubberized EVA. In this type, what Hoka does is make the outer surface of the midsole rubberized.

This way they saved up on the rubber strips of durable rubber and simultaneously lighten the overall weight of the shoe.

However, I felt that the durably of such shoes are slightly less than that of the rubber sole shoes. Hoka also uses this similar method for the exposed areas of the midsole in-between rubber-covered areas.

With Nike, the usage of durable rubber on the outsole is more. However, you can still find rubberized foam in the less-premium models from Nike.

The outsole design of Nike is generated through a computer and provides you with a precise groove and flex pattern. The input of this design is based on the inputs from thousand of athletes and this provides you with a running outsole that is durable, grippy, and provides slightly added cushioning.

There are various patterns that you will be able to find on the outsole of the shoes from Nike and one of them is the waffle pattern that is present at the forefoot of Nike models like Pegasus.

On landing, they distribute the load and also grip the ground firmly. This way it acts as a cushioning material as well.

Although the rubber is distributed throughout the outsole, it is not a continuous piece of rubber. This ensures that the running shoe has optimal flexibility and doesn’t add additional stiffness to the sole. This is because the inherent nature of durable rubber is stiffness.

The other thing that Nike uses to improve the flexibility of the shoe is the addition of flex grooves on the forefoot. This is not present in all the models from Nike, but some of the popular models like Flex Experience Run have this feature. Also, this is a method that Nike uses and you will not find it in Hoka.

The main reason to have that is to help in easier heel-to-toe transition which is handled by Hoka using its meta rocker technology.

This is an alternate technology that Nike uses to improve the heel-to-toe transition. Also, the shoes from Nike that uses rocker technology don’t have these flex grooves for obvious reasons.

This is what is used in the outsole of road running shoes. For trail runners, both companies use aggressive lugs that may be unidirectional or multidirectional.

Nike shoes have tapering lugs that easily get embedded in the trails, providing you with a lot more stability while running on them.

Is there any difference when you run in either of these shoes?

Grip-wise you won’t be able to tell much. They grip the roads or the trails pretty well and are excellent to provide durability to these shoes.

Upper

Hoka and Nike both uses engineered mesh on the upper for durability, support, and to keep the runner’s feet secured.

In Hoka, there are mainly two types of meshed…one is the engineered mesh and the other is engineered jacquard mesh.

In Jacquard mesh, complex designs are directly knitted in the mesh whereas, in engineered mesh, such a thing is not there…

For example, the upper of Mach Supersonic is jacquard mesh whereas Bondi is open engineered mesh.

With both types of meshes, you will not have issues with breathability…however, a jacquard mesh appears to be thicker and denser.

Hoka has started transitioning to a more sustainable way of production and is using a lot of recycled materials in its shoes.

A similar thing can be observed in Nike as well and one such initiative is to replace their double-layered cardboard boxes with single-layer boxes and to make that box with 90% recycled materials.

Most of the upper of Hoka shoes have TPU overlays…these overlays are used to reinforce the midfoot structure of the shoes.

The tongue in the models of Hoka is made from engineered mesh and has nice padding. They are anatomically designed and are great with breathability.

Also, the tongue may be gusseted/integrated or non-gusseted/free…Since the design of the tongues is anatomical, they will rarely move even if they are free.

Hoka is also transitioning to include that extended pull tab in its models.  Some of the models like Bondi or Arahi still have the traditional lace pull tab at the back of the heel.

However, the likes of Clifton or Mach have already included that in the upper and now provide additional support to the Achilles area plus. This has also made it easy to put on these shoes.

The heel counter of Hoka shoes are well constructed and locks your heel in. This doesn’t allow your heels to move around for any unforeseen accidents and/or create blisters.

These Hoka Shoes have a sockliner which is from OrthoLite and most of them are removable. These are molded EVA sockliner and provide you with comfort and proper arch support.

Nike uses a couple of technologies when it comes to the upper, however, it boils down to a primary type of mesh which is the engineered mesh.

Unlike Hoka, Nike has not yet adopted jacquard mesh and it doesn’t seem that they will adopt that in the future.

However, with engineered mesh they use two primary kinds…one is the Fresh knit that you will find in shoes like Flex Experience Run and Flyknit that you will find in shoes like Pegasus.

Flyknit is a more premium upper which is manufactured from strong yet lightweight yarn. It is woven into a single-piece upper to avoid unnecessary stitching.

With Flyknit another thing that comes into the picture is the Flywire cables. They are present in the lace area and provide additional midfoot stability. They also secure the midfoot.

Many of the models of Nike have adopted that extended pull tab feature which is excellent for easily wearing this shoe.

Also, the tongue that is present in most of the models has a padded tongue. This is a key thing for comfort as it will keep you comfortable while running.

The tongue of Nike models may be gusseted or non-gusseted depending on the models and will provide you with excellent comfort.

The laces of all the models of Nike now have a flat lace. This helps to keep them remain tied while running. Although this should have been the case ideally, for some of the models (I personally own a Nike Air Zoom Structure), they tend to come untied while running.

Related: 10 Best Walking Shoes For Blister Prone Feet (Highly Rated)

Other Considerations

Hoka and Nike both produce running shoes that are very well made. Both the brands produce running shoes whose most models are true to size. However, if you try to draw parallels to the sizing, then you may have a bit of difficulty as the way they represent sizing is a bit different.

But you can still co-relate that using the length of the shoes either represented in cm or inches.

As we know, Hoka only produces running shoes that are low drop. However, Nike covers a wider range of drops and some of them belong to the category of high heel drops.

Related: 10 Best Running Shoes With High Heel Drop (12mm-15mm)

Durability

Hoka shoes may last you around 350 miles. Although, how long they will last will depend on how careful you are with the shoes and how you are using them.

With any highly cushioned running shoe, this is common and this doesn’t come as a surprise. Anything which lasts for 300-500 miles is considered good durability and Hoka is right in the ballpark of that.

Nike on the other hand lasts a bit lesser and according to Nike quality engineers, an average Nike shoe lasts for 200-300 miles. Of course, that changes from shoe to shoe and the usage, but that is how it is…

This is a bit surprising as I expected that due to the maximal nature of Hoka, they may last lesser than Nike. However, other than this, these shoes are considered at par.

Related: Topo Vs Altra Sizing Chart: How Different Are They?

Cushioning

The main cushioning material of Hoka is CMEVA. This is a cushy material and will provide you with exceptional impact resistance and is great for running longer distances.

They have included different technologies together to provide you with an excellent running experience.

The main material for cushioning in Nike running shoes is Zoom or Air Zoom. In some cases, they use Cushlon foam also. All these materials are a derivative of EVA foam and are combined with some specific technologies to make it even more comfortable.

Comfort-wise, I’ll consider both of these brands at par.

Related: Asics Gel Kayano Vs Nike Pegasus: Which One Is The Best For You?

Hoka Bondi Vs Clifton – Which Hoka Is Best For Your Feet?

Overall Fit And Comfort

The overall fit of Hoka is a bit widish. It will not be comfortable for most of the runners. However, one big limitation with Hoka is that, apart from the most popular models, the rest of them are not available in wide fit.

A similar thing exists with Nike as well. Apart from a couple of models, Nike is not available in wide fit.

This is bit of a problem for the runners who need a wider fit. Also, it may be only my perception, but I find Nike’s fit a bit snugger than a Hoka…but it is there…

Pricing

The starting price of Nike road running shoes is around $40 and in the range between $40 to $100, you get many models. You will also get the Nike Juniper Trail which is a trail running shoe.

However, with Hoka, the starting price of their road running range is around $130. You will not find a road running shoe in the $50-$100 range.

So, if you want to switch to Hoka from Nike, then depending on the model of Nike that you use, the price jump can be rather stiff.

However, if you are using something that is a more premium model from Nike, then the price point may match that of Hoka.

Actually, there are some models of Nike that costs way more than the most premium shoe from Hoka like Nike Zoom Alphafly Next Nature.

So, price-wise, Nike as a brand provides a much wider range than Hoka and for that matter has a lot more models than Hoka as well.

Conclusion

If you compare Nike Vs Hoka, both the brands are very similar in a lot of ways.

If one scores one point in some aspect, the other takes leads in some other category. Also, while comparing, I came to realize that some of the shortcomings that Hoka has are also present in Nike and vice versa.

Overall, both are excellent running shoe brands and will serve you well. However, which one will suit you will be completely dependent on your preference.

Madhusree Basu

Madhusree Basu

Author, Admin

Blogger and a fitness enthusiast. She loves running and Yoga and everything in between. She started running to manage her weight and to eat to her heart’s content. A true foodie at heart she shares whatever knowledge she has gained throughout the years about weight management and fitness.

Saucony Vs Asics Sizing Chart: How Are They Different?

Saucony Vs Asics Sizing Chart: How Are They Different?

When you compare Saucony vs ASICS sizing, it becomes very interesting.

TBH, I also did not know what exactly are the differences, before I did the research for this article.

When you compare data side by side, the kind of details that pop up is just fascinating…

Did you know ASICS has some odd measurements for some of the sizes and those size numbers actually tally up with Saucony, whose length is again different from ASICS?

Did I confuse you? Well, don’t worry I’ll present the differences between ASICS and Saucony sizing as clearly as possible.

BTW, I did not compare the heel-to-toe drop of Saucony and Asics with each other as I’ve already covered that in this article.

Let’s procced…

Related: Do Hokas Run Big, Small, Or True To Size?

Saucony Vs Asics Sizing

Saucony Vs ASICS Sizing: Differences

1. For some lengths ASICS lengths increase by 0.25cm and not by cm0.5 like 25.25cm, 28.25cm for men, and 22.75cm, 25cm.75 for women. Such an increase is not present in Saucony.

2. For Saucony women’s size starts from 21.5cm(8.46 in)/5(US)/3(UK)/35.5(EU). For ASICS women’s size starts from 22.75cm (8.96 in)/5.5(US)/3.5(UK)/36(EU).

3. For Saucony men’s size starts from 22.5cm (8.86 in)/4.5(US)/3.5(UK)/37(EU). For ASICS men’s size starts from 22.5cm (8.86 in)/4(US)/3(UK)36(EU).

4. Most of the men’s sizes of Saucony are equivalent to an ASICS number by 0.5 steps. It is the same for women’s except for the bigger sizes.

5. For women’s shoes ASICS has the sizes 5.5(US)/3.5(UK)/36(EU) corresponding to the length of 22.75cm(8.96 in). Such a size is not present in Saucony.

6. For women’s shoes ASICS has the size 9(US)/7(UK)/40.5(EU) corresponding to the length of 25.75cm(10.13 in). Although the same numbers are present in Saucony it represents the length of 25.5cm (10.03 in).

7. For men’s shoes, ASICS has the size 7(US)/6(UK)/40(EU) corresponding to the length of 25.25cm(10.13 in). Although the same numbers are present in Saucony it represents the length of 25cm (9.84 in).

8. For men’s shoes, ASICS has the size 10.5(US)/9.5(UK)/44.5(EU) corresponding to the length of 28.25cm(10.13 in). Although the same numbers are present in Saucony it represents the length of 28.5cm (11.22 in).

9. Saucony has more sizes of men’s shoes for the longer lengths than ASICS.

10. For women’s shoes ASICS has more sizes available than Saucony for longer lengths.

11. For women’s shoes Saucony has more sizes available than Asics for shorter lengths.

Related: Running Shoe Heel Drop Chart (Illustrated)

Saucony Vs ASICS Sizing: Women’s Shoes (cm, inches)

cm (inches)

Saucony (US)

ASICS (US)

Saucony (UK)

ASICS (UK)

Saucony (EU)

ASICS (EU)

-

4

-

2

-

34.5

-

-

4.5

-

2.5

-

35

-

21.5 cm

(8.46 in)

5

-

3

-

35.5

-

22 cm

(8.66 in)

5.5

-

3.5

-

36

-

22.5 cm

(8.85 in)

6

-

4

-

37

-

22.75 cm

(8.96 in)

-

5.5

-

3.5

-

36

23 cm

(9.05 in)

6.5

6

4.5

4

37.5

37

23.5 cm

(9.25 in)

7

6.5

5

4.5

38

37.5

24 cm

(9.45 in)

7.5

7

5.5

5

38.5

38

24.5 cm

(9.65 in)

8

7.5

6

5.5

39

39

25 cm

(9.85 in)

8.5

8

6.5

6

40

39.5

25.5 cm

(10.03 in)

9

8.5

7

6.5

40.5

40

25.75 cm

(10.13 in)

-

9

-

7

-

40.5

26 cm

(10.24 in)

9.5

9.5

7.5

7.5

41

41.5

26.5 cm

(10.43 in)

10

10

8

8

42

42

27 cm

(10.63 in)

10.5

10.5

8.5

8.5

42.5

42.5

27.5 cm

(10.83 in)

11

11

9

9

43

43.5

28 cm

(11.03 in)

-

11.5

-

9.5

-

44

28.5 cm

(11.23 in)

-

12

-

10

-

44.5

Download Saucony Vs Asics Size Chart For Women

Related: Topo Vs Altra Sizing Chart: How Different Are They?

ASICS Vs Saucony Sizing: Men’s Shoes (cm, inches)

cm (inches)

Saucony (US)

ASICS (US)

Saucony (UK)

ASICS (UK)

Saucony (EU)

ASICS (EU)

-

3

-

2

-

35

-

-

3.5

-

2.5

-

35.5

-

-

4

-

3

-

36

-

22.5cm

(8.86 in)

4.5

4

3.5

3

37

36

23cm

(9.05 in)

5

4.5

4

3.5

37.5

37

23.5cm

(9.25 in)

5.5

5

4.5

4

38

37.5

24cm

(9.45 in)

6

5.5

5

4.5

38.5

38

24.5cm

(9.64 in)

6.5

6

5.5

5

39

39

25 cm

(9.84 in)

7

6.5

6

5.5

40

39.5

25.25 cm

(9.94 in)

-

7

-

6

-

40

25.5 cm

(10.04 in)

7.5

7.5

6.5

6.5

40.5

40.5

26 cm

(10.24 in)

8

8

7

7

41

41.5

26.5 cm

(10.43 in)

8.5

8.5

7.5

7.5

42

42

27 cm

(10.63 in)

9

9

8

8

42.5

42.5

27.5 cm

(10.83 in)

9.5

9.5

8.5

8.5

43

43.5

28 cm

(11.02 in)

10

10

9

9

44

44

28.25 cm

(11.12 in)

-

10.5

-

9.5

-

44.5

28.5 cm

(11.22 in)

10.5

11

9.5

10

44.5

45

29 cm

(11.42 in)

11

11.5

10

10.5

45

46

29.5 cm

(11.61 in)

11.5

12

10.5

11

46

46.5

30 cm

(11.81 in)

12

-

11

-

46.5

-

30.5 cm

(12 in)

12.5

-

11.5

-

47

-

31 cm

(12.20 in)

13

-

12

-

48

-

-

14

-

13

-

49

-

-

15

-

14

-

50

-

-

16

-

15

-

51.5

-

Download ASICS size compared to Saucony (Men)

Related: New Balance Size Chart Vs Nike

Related: Top 15 Best Running Shoes for Morton’s Neuroma Reviewed

Do ASICS Run Bigger Or Smaller Than Saucony?

No, ASICS doesn’t run bigger or smaller than Saucony as for almost every length of Saucony there is an ASICS running shoe present, except for some of the higher and lower sizes.

However, this misconception arises because the numbers that the shoe represents in both brands are different.

For example, let’s pick the size 6.5(US) of Saucony for the women’s shoes which are 23 cm in length. The same length is represented by ASICS with the number 6(US).

Let’s check another example…

For the length of 26.5 cm of women’s shoes both ASICS and Saucony represent it with the number 10(US).

You can find many such examples where for the same length the number that ASICS uses is bigger than that of Saucony.

So, basically every number that a shoe represents in any of these brands may represent the same or a different length and neither of them runs smaller or bigger than the other.

Madhusree Basu

Madhusree Basu

Author, Admin

Blogger and a fitness enthusiast. She loves running and Yoga and everything in between. She started running to manage her weight and to eat to her heart’s content. A true foodie at heart she shares whatever knowledge she has gained throughout the years about weight management and fitness.

Should I Go On The Treadmill Before Or After Workout?

Should I Go On The Treadmill Before Or After Workout?

Last Updated: June 10th, 2022

Treadmills are very useful equipment. They help you to get your cardio session in the comfort of your home.

It is a great form of workout if you are trying to lose weight or maintain your cardiovascular health in general. Also, it can be used as a part of your warmup session or as a full-blown workout routine…

But with something as effective as a treadmill, there are a lot of questions and myths surrounding it, the primary being when you should do the treadmill session…

Should you do it before, after, or in-between…

Today, we will be demystifying this question and try to provide you with a straightforward answer and list out the advantages and disadvantages of using a treadmill during various times of workout…

Let’s begin…

Should I Go On A Treadmill Before Or After Workout

Should I Go On The Treadmill Before Or After Workout?

The treadmill can be done before or after a workout or in between different exercises.  There is no universal rule about the time when you should run on a treadmill.

Although you can run on the treadmill anytime, there are pros and cons associated with all the methods:

Should I Go On A Treadmill in-between Workout

Benefits of running on a treadmill before a workout:

If you run on a treadmill before a workout you are basically doing cardio before your workout. Your heart will start beating fast and your entire body will start heating up.

So, you can have a shorter warm-up session if you are going after a 15 min of treadmill session as all the muscles in your body would have sufficiently warmed up after the treadmill session.

Also, you will burn some extra calories due to this treadmill session. The amount of calories that you will burn depends on the speed, incline, weight, and age (considering a 15 min session).

Disadvantages of running on a treadmill before a workout:

If you are running on a treadmill before a workout, there are some inherent disadvantages to that, the first being that, your performance in your later workout session will decrease.

This is because, once you have done a treadmill session, you have already used up some of your energy. So, you will have lesser energy to spend on the workout session.

This way your workout may get a bit impacted.

A probable solution can be to have some pre-workout drink that will supplement that energy. You can have that, just before you start your workout and not during the treadmill session.

That way, during the time of the workout, the pre-workout drink will take effect and will boost your energy that much. This way, you will be able to continue your workout session without your performance going down.

However, remember, that when the effects of your pre-workout drink wear off, you will feel that your energy is depleting. So the trick is to properly time your pre-workout drink.

Pre-workout drinks

There are different types of pre-workout drinks. Some are good for your body and some are outright bad. Also, you may not be knowing which one to go for and may rely on someone who can guide you.

If that person is trustworthy and is not only looking for their benefit, then by all means go for it.

Otherwise, go for something over which you have control.

I’m not a fan of any health drink. It is my own reservation and also, it is due to the fact that the fitness industry is filled with scammers and untrustworthy products.

My fitness instructor suggested one pre-workout mix that is available in your house…

Before the workout, I drink a cup of black coffee along with a handful of dry fruits. This provides me with sufficient energy to continue my workout session after I’ve done my 15 mins of treadmill

Should I Go On A Treadmill After Workout

Benefits of running on a treadmill after a workout:

The first benefit of running on a treadmill after a workout is that, you are not using up your precious energy on the treadmill.

This will help you to use that energy on the workout and progress towards your goals faster.

Another benefit of running on a treadmill after a workout is that, you will be burning more calories than if you have done it before your workout.

The thing is, when you have already done your workout, your energy tank is already used up. So, to carry on with another 15 min of treadmill session will take a lot from you. This is the reason that you will burn a lot more calories in an after-workout treadmill session.

Disadvantages of running on a treadmill after a workout:

After the workout session, you may be so tired that, you may want to skip the treadmill session.

If you are under the supervision of an instructor then you may not have to option other than to follow through. However, if you are on your own, chances are you will skip your treadmill session.

That way you may very regularly be skipping your cardio, which may not be good for your overall cardiovascular health.

If you are feeling too tired and you don’t want to continue on your treadmill routine, then try this…

Have some sort of a health drink of BCCA (branched-chained amino acid)…this will give you an energy boost to carry on further with your treadmill routine.

Should I Go On A Treadmill Before workout

What about doing a treadmill session in between your workout?

You can absolutely do that. As mentioned before there is no hard and fast rule of when you should do a treadmill routine.

If you prefer to do a cardio session in between your workout, then go for it.

Also, when you will be doing the cardio session varies from instructor to instructor. Some prefer to get it over with at the beginning of the session, some prefer to do it after the workout session for a more calorie-burning effect…

For some, they prefer to include the treadmill session both in the beginning and in the end…this way their client will be burning more calories. (this is what my instructor did when I was trying to lose weight).

And there are some who prefer to do this in between a workout session, mostly as part of a circuit training.

But let’s say you don’t want to do a cardio session in the same session when you are working out, then what will you do?

Will you completely skip the cardio and not reap its benefit? Or, is there an alternate solution…

There is actually an alternate solution…

What you can do is, include your cardio session, after you have woken up in the morning, like going for a morning run…

If you are going to do a shorter run, then do it on empty stomach…this way you will be burning more calories. If you are going for a longer run, then have a small snack 20 min prior to the cardio session…

Then you won’t be stopping in between the session due to lack of energy…however, don’t eat too much as you will risk throwing up during your cardio session.

Or,

You can go for a night walk…just after your dinner…

Don’t go running at this time for the above-mentioned reason…

Since our bodies are not used to any kind of heavy work after dinner, they will put in extra effort to sustain this walking session. This way, you will be burning more calories, assuming that weight loss is your goal.

Conclusion

To sum it all up, it really doesn’t matter when you include your treadmill session during a workout. You can easily do it before, after, in-between, or before and after your workout.

What matters is, that you include your treadmill or any other cardio session in your workout routine.

This way, you will be reaping all its benefits and have a more wholesome fitness routine.

WHEN SHOULD YOU GO ON A TREADMILL DURING A WORKOUT SESSION

Madhusree Basu

Madhusree Basu

Author, Admin

Blogger and a fitness enthusiast. She loves running and Yoga and everything in between. She started running to manage her weight and to eat to her heart’s content. A true foodie at heart she shares whatever knowledge she has gained throughout the years about weight management and fitness.

Sourav Sarkar

Sourav Sarkar

Reviewer, Certified Fitness Instructor

Certified fitness trainer and an ex-professional bodybuilder, he has trained more than 500 fitness enthusiasts and has more than 15 years of on-the-job experience.

Brooks Vs Saucony Vs Hoka: Which Brand Is Right For You?

Brooks Vs Saucony Vs Hoka: Which Brand Is Right For You?

Last Updated: June 2nd, 2022

Brooks Vs Saucony Vs Hoka. All of these sports shoe brands are among the most popular running shoe brands…

They are comfortable and they have their own set of fan-following…

But between these three brands, is there anyone who shines the most? Let’s find out…

Brooks Vs Saucony Vs Hoka

Brooks Vs Saucony Vs Hoka: Differences

1. Hoka shoe’s maximum drop is 6mm whereas both Saucony and Brooks have a maximum drop of 12mm.

2. Both Hoka and Brooks produce more types of sports shoes, whereas Saucony produces only running shoes.

3. Brooks manufactures all types of sports apparel including socks, Hoka has shorts, tops, and leggings and Saucony manufactures tops, bottoms, and innerwear for women.

4. Brooks has 4 trail-running models and 25 road running models of shoes, Hoka has 12 trail-running models and 20 road-running models of shoes, whereas Saucony has 5 trail-running models and 15 road-running models.

5. Between three brands Hoka has the thickest cushioning with a 40mm heel stack and a 36mm forefoot stack (Bondi) closely followed by Brooks Cascadia (39mm hs/35mm fs) and Saucony Endorphin Pro 2 and Saucony Hurricane 23 (39mm hs/31mm fs).

6. Between the three, Hoka has the most models of running shoes, followed by Brooks and Saucony in that order.

7. Between the three, Brooks shoes look more stylish whereas both Hoka and Saucony shoes have a bulky appearance.

Hoka and New Balance: Similarities

  • The minimum drop of Hoka, Brooks, and Saucony is 4mm.
  • Brooks, Saucony, and Hoka are shifting towards eco-friendly and sustainable materials.
  • All three have running shoes in the maximal cushioning category.
  • All three manufacture running shoes for trails and roads.
  • All three brands have a non-restrictive fit.
  • All three use engineered mesh in the upper of their running shoes.
  • All three use a foam material that is a derivative of EVA foam.
  • All three have at least one model that has a carbon fiber plate.

Shoe Construction

As a runner, you may already have a favorite brand. It may be Hoka, Saucony, Brooks, or any other brand…

Choice of a running shoe is very personal…and between these three brands which you will prefer will also be completely based on the comfort that you feel in them.

For some, they may like the flex grooves of Brooks or the meta rocker technology of Hoka. Or, they may like the no-fuss minimalistic Saucony Kinvara.

There is no definite way to tell which shoe you will like the most, although, all of these are well constructed and all the companies have spent years together to perfect the comfort that these shoes provide…

So, let’s find out what these brands have to offer and how they will benefit you…

Midsole

When selecting a running shoe, one of the main things that you will look at is the midsole. This is a make or breaks for your purchase decision.

Then between Hoka, Brooks, and Saucony which fares the most and which is worthy of your investment…let’s find out…

When it comes to Brooks, there are only a couple of types of midsoles that are present. Each of these midsoles has its own characteristics and will provide you with a unique experience. We will describe each of them below…

Brooks midsole type: Cushion

The midsole material that falls in this category is the DNA LOFT. This is a carefully calibrated mix of mesh, air, and rubber to provide you with one of the softest and cushiest midsoles available on the market.

To come up with this material, Brooks has mixed EVA foam with rubber and air. This provides you with that soft and cushy feeling when you wear the shoes like Brooks Ghost, Brooks Adrenaline, etc.

Another type of midsole that belongs to the cushion category is the BioMoGo DNA. This was a similar type of material to DNA LOFT. However, in many shoes, Brooks is transitioning to DNA LOFT from BioMOGo DNA as the former is a bit softer and cushier.

Brooks midsole type: Energize

The cushion material that belongs to this category is the DNA AMP. It is a responsive material and provides you with excellent energy return rather than absorbing it.

The material is springy and bouncy and is not as soft as the DNA LOFT.

It is made from polyurethane (PU) foam which is encased in a thin layer of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU).

In this variation of PU that is being used in these shoes, you will find plastic combined with rubber for the firmness and the elasticity. The TPU also provides DNA AMP with additional rigidity.

Shoes that belong to this category are Brooks Levitate.

Brooks midsole type: Speed

This type of cushioning is meant for fast and adaptive energy return. The midsole material that is created for this purpose is built with nitrogen infusion.

It is a very lightweight midsole that is meant for speed and good energy return.

Another aspect that imparts the speed to these kinds of midsoles is the Carbon Fiber Propulsion Plate. This is an ultralight plate that helps to keep you in your preferred motion path so that you run more efficiently.

Shoes that belong to this category are Brooks Hyperion Tempo, Brooks Launch, Brooks Launch GTS, and Brooks Hyperion Elite.

Holistic GuideRails System

Apart from the midsole cushioning, there is another component that comes into play if you are dealing with overpronation.

To provide you with stability, Brooks has come up with something called Holistic GuideRails System.

This is excellent for providing you with support and bringing your knees back in the line of motion and protecting the knees from injuries.

Also, this is the standard technology that Brooks has incorporated in all of its stability shoes like Brooks Adrenaline GTS, Brooks Addiction GTS, Launch GTS, Brooks Beast, and Brooks Ariel.

Hoka Midsole

Like Brooks, Hoka also uses EVA foam as the base material for its midsoles however, it is being made into CMEVA or Compression-Molded EVA foam. This is the primary material for the midsole of Hoka Shoes.

Apart from CMEVA, for a more smooth and natural heel-to-toe transition, Hoka uses meta rocker technology which is present in almost all the Hoka shoes.

However, as mentioned earlier in the Hoka Vs New Balance post, there are basically two types of rocker technologies. The early-stage meta rocker and the late-stage meta rocker.

The difference between these two types of meta rockers is the position where the transition zone is placed.

In the case of an early-stage meta rocker, the transition zone is placed behind the metatarsals, whereas for a late-stage meta rocker, the transition zone is placed in front of the metatarsal.

For stability, Hoka uses a J-Frame which is basically a firmer foam on the medial side in the shape of a J. This provides additional support to the runners with overpronation.

For Hoka, there is another H-Frame technology that comes into play in some shoes like Gaviota. The midfoot H-Frame provides you with increased upper support and also locks down the midfoot.

Saucony Midsole

Saucony midsoles are also using the base material of EVA foam and have changed it to suit different types of running and cushioning requirements.

Here are some of the technologies that come into play in the midsole of Saucony running shoes:

PWRRUN

PWRRUN is one of the primary materials that are used in the midsoles of Saucony. It is a TPU EVA blend and provides you responsive and cushioned feeling.

All the subsequent midsole materials are mostly an enhanced version of PWRRUN except for VERSAFOAM.

You will find PWRRUN in Saucony Kinvara, Saucony Ride, Saucony Echelon, and Saucony Guide among others.

PWRRUN+

PWRRUN+ is an enhanced version of PWRRUN and is lighter, softer, and springier than PWRRUN.

This will provide you with excellent feedback and will keep your feet well protected.

Shoes that belong to the PWRRUN+ category are Hurricane, Triumph, Cohesion, etc.

PWRRUN PB

This is yet another improvement in PWRRUN. The PWRRUN PB midsoles are made from a PEBA-based midsole and are very soft.

The responsiveness of these midsoles is slightly less and will provide you with excellent cushioning.

Running shoes from Saucony that uses PWRRUN PB are Endorphin Pro, Freedom, etc.

VERSARUN

This is a durable cushioning that is based on EVA foam and is very responsive. This holds its shape for a variety of activities.

Shoes that use VERSARUN are Cohesion.

Carbon Fiber Plate

The carbon Fiber Plate is introduced in the Endorphin models of Saucony. This is extremely lightweight and durable and improves the responsiveness of these shoes.

It is great for speed shoes and is excellent for speed drills.

SPEED ROLL technology

This is an advanced technology which is basically a footwear geometry that provides you with an always forward feel.

S-CURVE Carbon Plate

This is the kind of carbon plate that is present in midsoles of shoes like Endorphin PRO. It is shaped in the form of a curve at the arch of the foot and it bends downwards slightly at the balls of the foot.

This improves the responsiveness of the shoe…

Related: Brooks Ghost Vs Saucony Endorphin Speed: Which One Is The Best Choice For You?

To improve the stability of the support shoes, Saucony uses an extended medial post. This stabilizes your feet and controls your overpronation.

If you try to compare the cushioning level of Saucony, Hoka, and Brooks, you will find all of them have all the varieties from ultra-plush cushioning to very responsive running shoes.

All of them have some models that incorporate the carbon fiber plate.

However, I felt, that the cushioning of DNA LOFT was slightly softer than that of PWRRUN and CMEVA. Being said that, I personally prefer a soft running shoe and have always liked DNA LOFT for that matter.

So, setting my bias aside, the kind of cushioning and responsiveness that these shoes provide is very good and you can consider them at par.

However, if you want to go for something which has an ultra-high level of cushioning then Bondi will be a great choice for neutral runners.

Go for Beast or Ariel if you are an overpronating runner. If you like minimal springy cushioning, the Saucony Kinvara should be your choice.

Outsole

The outsole of Hoka is mostly made of durable blown rubber which is highly abrasion-resistant.

This will provide you with an excellent grip on both wet and dry surfaces and is excellent for any kind of terrain.

The outsole of Hoka shoes is not completely covered with rubber. Instead, it has rubber stips placed on the high wear and tear prone areas. This reinforces those areas and improves durability.

Another type of outsole is common in Hoka. In this type, Hoka uses a rubberized version of CMEVA. Actually, this is not any separate layer, rather the exposed midsole layer is rubberized.

This way they saved up on the rubber strips of durable rubber and simultaneously lighten the overall weight of the shoe.

However, durability-wise, these outsoles are a bit less durable, and also the traction felt slightly lesser on the wet surfaces.

The outsole of Brooks employs similar things as in Hoka and Saucony to provide you with a durable outsole that has a good grip on both wet and dry surfaces.

It uses HPR rubber strips on the high wear and tears prone zones like the forefoot and the heels. The area between the forefoot and the heels is often devoid of such kind of rubber.

However, those areas are made in such a way that they don’t come in contact with the ground.

One thing that is common in all three brands is that they employ similar techniques to improve the flexibility of the sole.

To improve the durability of the shoe, the usage of hard rubber is probably the only option. However, that adds to the stiffness of the outsole.

For that, there are flex grooves present on the forefoot. For Brooks, they are called Omega Flex Grooves. However, based on the shoe model, the type of grooves that are used also differ.

For example, in Brooks Ghost, the grooves are almost horizontal, whereas, in Launch, it is more in the shape of an arrow pattern.

You will not see such a difference in the rest of the two brands which use almost horizontal grooves for imparting flexibility to the forefoot.

For trail running shoes Brooks uses TrailTack. This is a sticky rubber compound that provides excellent grip on the trails.

The outsole of Saucony basically uses blown rubber that is spread across the forefoot and the heels.

Also, the kind of techniques that Saucony uses is similar to that of Brooks and Hoka for improving the grip and flexibility of the shoes.

However, the technologies that Saucony uses vary greatly from these brands and also from its shoe to shoe.

The technologies that Saucony uses in its outsole are:

TRI-FLEX

It improves the force dispersion over a larger surface and provides excellent flexibility and traction. It is often used with the EVERUN topsole.

XT-600

This is a carbon rubber compound that is used for improved durability. They provide excellent traction as well.

XT-900

This is a carbon rubber that uses excellent traction and durability. It is an improvement on XT-600.

CRYSTAL RUBBER

It provides you with very high durability and great traction. This material is more flexible than the XT series and provides you with a more natural movement.

Grip-wise, I would consider all the three brands at par. However, the rubberized midsoles that are used in some of the models of Hoka and Saucony have slightly lesser durability. Other than that, the outsoles of all these three brands are at par.

Upper

There are a lot of things that go into the upper of Hoka, Brooks, and Saucony.

However, what is common in all of these brands is that mostly they use Engineered Mesh.

Hoka mainly uses two types of mesh materials…one is the engineered mesh and the other is engineered jacquard mesh.

In Jacquard mesh, you will find complex designs are directly knitted in the mesh…whereas engineered mesh will give you a more open feel…

The breathability of both of these types of meshes is good…However, the appearance of jacquard mesh is denser and thicker.

To reduce its carbon footprint, Hoka has started using recycled materials for its upper…although not all of the models have recycled material, Hoka is speedily shifting towards that…

Most of the upper of Hoka shoes have TPU overlays…these overlays are used to reinforce the midfoot structure of the shoes.

The tongue of Hoka shoes is made from a similar mesh material as that of the upper and gives it a more uniform look like that of the upper. This makes the tongue breathable and comfortable.

Also, the tongue may be gusseted/integrated or non-gusseted/free…However, being anatomically designed, they will sit on the top of your foot properly and will not move around unnecessarily.

Hoka has started using that extended pull tabs in many models like Clifton or Mach. This is an Achilles support and also helps you to wear the shoe more easily…Also, it enhances the overall appeal of the shoe.

The heel counter of Hoka shoes are well constructed and locks your heel in. This doesn’t allow your heels to move around for any unforeseen accidents and/or create blisters.

Most of the shoes from Hoka have a Silicone Print Logo, some are glossy and some have a matt finish. This only enhances the appeal of the Hoka Shoes.

These Hoka Shoes have a sockliner which is from OrthoLite and most of them are removable. These are molded EVA sockliner and provide you with comfort and proper arch support.

The upper of Brooks running shoes are mostly made up of engineered mesh with the exception of the shoes that use GORE-TEX or GTX. It doesn’t use jacquard mesh as Hoka uses in some of the models.

The mesh material is well ventilated and keeps the airflow high inside the shoe.

Brooks is gradually moving towards a more sustainable type of mesh and is using recycled materials in its upper.

This is helping them to reduce their carbon footprint and is contributing to a cleaner environment.

Similar to Hoka and Saucony, Brooks also uses a removable sockliner that is meant to provide you with excellent comfort and arch support.

These sockliners are also breathable keeping the overall in-shoe environment dry.

Apart from this similarity, Brooks like Hoka is shifting towards the extended pull tab look. This not only improves the style of the shoes but also provides you with an easy way to put on the shoe.

The tongue of the running shoes of the Brooks brand is well padded and is mostly made of mesh material.

This makes the tongue comfortable and breathable, and it sits comfortably between the laces and the skin of the top of your feet. This avoids rubbing the laces which may cause blisters.

Like Hoka, the tongue of Brooks shoes may be gusseted or non-gusseted based on the model. However, what I’ve seen is no matter which model you choose, the tongue stays in place while running.

If you look at the upper of Saucony, it also has engineered mesh on the different models. The mesh that Saucony uses is also very breathable and like Brooks will help to keep the in-shoe environment cool and dry.

However, it uses FORMFIT in different models to provide you with exceptional fit and stretch according to the shape of your feet.

Most of the models of Saucony have adopted that extended pull tab. However, that pull tab is not as evident as that in Hoka or Brooks. If you are not observant, you will surely miss it. However, this also provides that added support to your Achilles area.

Also, the tongue of the shoes of Saucony is thick and well padded like its collar. This will keep you comfortable and will not move around while running.

In most of the models of Saucony, the tongue is anatomically designed and will provide you with the utmost comfort.

The laces that all these brands have adopted is a flat lace. They are mostly polyester laces that remain in place and are properly tied when you are running.

All the models have overlays on them. This reinforces the support of the upper and also enhances the overall style of the shoe.

Comfort-wise, the upper of all the three brands are at par, however, style-wise, I like Brooks more, followed by Hoka and then Saucony. This is a personal preference though, and it may vary for you.

Related: 10 Best Walking Shoes For Blister Prone Feet (Highly Rated)

Other Considerations

Hoka, Brooks and Saucony have a lot of similarities. All the brands produce running shoes whose most models are true to size although the way represent sizing may differ a bit. The cushioning is great, and so is the overall comfort.

Related: Topo Vs Altra Sizing Chart: How Different Are They?

However, there are a lot of differences. Firstly, Hoka is a low-drop shoe brand whereas both Saucony and Brooks have many models that have higher drops.

But most importantly, it is how they handle their cushioning which we have covered in great detail above.

Durability

Typically a Hoka shoe will last you for around 350 miles. After that, you may start to see the wear and tear.

Since most of the Hoka shoes fall in the max cushioned category, this is expected. I would invest in a good shoe that lasts for some lesser miles than spend the same money on a physician to fix the problems caused by a cheap running shoe.

For Brooks and Saucony, the durability is slightly higher around 400 to 450 miles. From a running distance perspective that may be another 1 month extra of running.

This is where I feel, Brooks fares slightly better.

Cushioning

The primary cushioning material of Hoka is CMEVA. It is a very cushy and responsive material. However, I feel, this is slightly stiffer than DNA LOFT which is one of the primary cushioning materials from Brooks.

Related: Hoka Bondi Vs Clifton – Which Hoka Is Best For Your Feet?

Brooks Ghost Vs Hoka Clifton – Which One Is Best For Your Feet?

Also, the PWRRUN or its further enhancements that you find in Saucony is soft and cushy. The cushioning is good and comfortable, but the bounciness could have been better.

However, that is slightly better with Hoka and Brooks.

It is hard to decide on which one is better as all the cushions score some points in one aspect and lose some in the other. But nonetheless, all of them are very comfortable. The final choice will be the kind that you would want…

Overall Fit And Comfort

The overall fit of both Brooks and Hoka are similar as both of them has a wideish fit. Saucony on the other hand, for some of the models, has a bit of a snug fit.

However, one big shortcoming of Hoka is that, apart from the popular models like Bondi and Clifton, most of the other models don’t have a wide fit.

This is true for Saucony as well, where apart from the models Kinvara and Triumph there are no wide shoes.

Brooks shines in this aspect. It has a wide and extra wide-fitting shoe for most of its models. This is good news for runners like me who have bunions. We need running shoes that are wider on the forefoot.

Related: 6 Best Running Shoes For Tailor’s Bunion

Pricing

The starting price of Brooks running shoes is around $75 and in the range between $75 to $100, you have a lot of variety including trail running shoes.

However, with Hoka, the starting price of their road running range is around $130. You will not find a road running shoe in the $50-$100 range.

For Saucony, the starting price is around $85. Also, in the price range up to $100, you will not have a lot of options.

So, if you want to just try out a Hoka or Saucony, then you will have to pay a little more than Brooks. Also, the choices that you will have, may not be what you want.

However, for the most premium shoes, all the models, the prices reach slightly above $200.

So, if you don’t want to spend a lot of money, then you can go for Brooks…

However, if you have a budget of $100 or above, you have options from all of these brands.

Conclusion

If you compare Saucony Vs Hoka Vs Brooks, all of these brands almost are at par.

There are a couple of places where Hoka gets a few extra points and in others, Brooks or Saucony scores high.

So, if we want to pick a winner then it will not be fair to the other two Brands. The whole thing that the choice between these brands will boil down to the kind of comfort you feel in these shoes.

For me, I prefer Brooks and I cannot describe all the reasons why…but it feels more comfortable for me…and I don’t end up with bunion pain.

Other than that, I loved the shoes of all the three brands and you will love them as well…

Madhusree Basu

Madhusree Basu

Author, Admin

Blogger and a fitness enthusiast. She loves running and Yoga and everything in between. She started running to manage her weight and to eat to her heart’s content. A true foodie at heart she shares whatever knowledge she has gained throughout the years about weight management and fitness.

Topo Vs Altra Sizing Chart: How Different Are They?

Topo Vs Altra Sizing Chart: How Different Are They?

Last Updated: June 2nd, 2022

Comparing the sizes of Topo and Altra is very interesting.

They have almost similar sizes with one of them offering a couple of extra sizes for both men and women.

Also, some of the size numbers in Topo and Altra are different, however, the length in cm or inches are the same.

That is why we have included, the length of the shoe in cm (inches) along with sizes for each country like US, UK, EU…

This helps standardize the sizes and you will be able to tally the sizes based on an actual length and not some arbitrary number.

Related: New Balance Size Chart Vs Nike

Topo Vs Altra Sizing

Topo Vs Altra Sizing: Differences

1. Topo Athletic’s minimum length: 22.5 cm (8.85 inches) W/25 cm (9.84 inches) M, Altra‘s minimum length: 22 cm (8.66 inches) W/26 cm (10.24 inches) M

2. Topo Athletic doesn’t have 5.5 (US)/3.5 (UK)/36 (EU), 11.5 (US)/9.5 (UK)/44 (EU), and 13 (US)/11 (UK)/46 (EU) for women and 16 (US)/15 (UK)/51.5 (EU) for men. All these sizes are available in Altra.

3. Altra doesn’t have 7 (US)/6 (UK)/40 (EU) and 7.5 (US)/6.5 (UK)/40.5 (EU) sizes for men. These sizes are available in Topo Athletic.

4. The size 44.5 (EU) of Altra is equivalent to 44 of Topo Athletic for women’s shoes.

5. The size 44 (EU) of Altra doesn’t have an equivalent size in Topo Athletic for women.

6. The size 47.5 (EU) of Topo Athletic is equivalent to 47 (EU) of Altra for the men’s version of the shoes.

Related: Running Shoe Heel Drop Chart (Illustrated)

Topo Athletic Vs Altra Sizing: Women’s Shoes (cm, inches)

cm (inches)

TA (US)

Altra (US)

TA (UK)

Altra (UK)

TA (EU)

Altra (EU)

22 cm

(8.66 in)

N/A

5.5

N/A

3.5

N/A

36

22.5 cm

(8.85 in)

6

6

4

4

37

37

23 cm

(9.05 in)

6.5

6.5

4.5

4.5

37.5

37.5

23.5 cm

(9.25 in)

7

7

5

5

38

38

24 cm

(9.45 in)

7.5

7.5

5.5

5.5

38.5

38.5

24.5 cm

(9.65 in)

8

8

6

6

39

39

25 cm

(9.85 in)

8.5

8.5

6.5

6.5

40

40

25.5 cm

(10.03 in)

9

9

7

7

40.5

40.5

26 cm

(10.24 in)

9.5

9.5

7.5

7.5

41

41

26.5 cm

(10.43 in)

10

10

8

8

42

42

27 cm

(10.63 in)

10.5

10.5

8.5

8.5

42.5

42.5

27.5 cm

(10.83 in)

11

11

9

9

43

43

28 cm

(11.02 in)

N/A

11.5

N/A

9.5

N/A

44

28.5 cm

(11.22 in)

12

12

10

10

44

44.5

29.5 cm

(11.61 in)

N/A

13

N/A

11

N/A

46

Download Topo Vs Altra Size Chart For Women

Related: Top 24 Best Running Shoes For Bunions Reviewed

Altra Vs Topo Sizing: Men’s Shoes (cm, inches)

cm (inches)

Topo (US)

Altra (US)

Topo (UK)

Altra (UK)

Topo (EU)

Altra (EU)

25 cm

(9.84 in)

7

N/A

6

N/A

40

N/A

25.5 cm

(10.04 in)

7.5

N/A

6.5

N/A

40.5

N/A

26 cm

(10.24 in)

8

8

7

7

41

41

26.5 cm

(10.43 in)

8.5

8.5

7.5

7.5

42

42

27 cm

(10.63 in)

9

9

8

8

42.5

42.5

27.5 cm

(10.83 in)

9.5

9.5

8.5

8.5

43

43

28 cm

(11.02 in)

10

10

9

9

44

44

28.5 cm

(11.22 in)

10.5

10.5

9.5

9.5

44.5

44.5

29 cm

(11.42 in)

11

11

10

10

45

45

29.5 cm

(11.61 in)

11.5

11.5

10.5

10.5

46

46

30 cm

(11.81 in)

12

12

11

11

46.5

46.5

30.5 cm

(12 in)

12.5

12.5

11.5

11.5

47.5

47

31 cm

(12.20 in)

13

13

12

12

48

48

32 cm

(12.60 in)

14

14

13

13

49

49

33 cm

(13 in)

15

15

14

14

50

50

34 cm

(13.39 in)

N/A

16

N/A

15

N/A

51.5

Download Altra size compared to Topo (Men)

Related: Top 15 Best Running Shoes for Morton’s Neuroma Reviewed

Do Topo Athletic Run Bigger Or Smaller Than Altra?

Most of the sizes of Topo Athletic are the same as that of Altra. However, there are a couple of them that varies.

First of all, some of the sizes that are available in the women’s version of Altra running shoes are not present in Topo Athletic running shoes.

In the men’s version, the situation is the opposite. Some of the sizes that are available in Topo Athletic are not present in Altra.

There is an anomaly with the size 44 (EU) of Topo Athletic and that of 44.5 (EU) of Altra. Lengthwise both are similar, however, the numbering is different, and also, this is the last size that is available from Topo Athletic in the women’s version of the shoes.

However, the interesting thing about this size is that they are represented by the same numbers for Altra and Topo Athletic for the US and UK regions.

A similar anomaly exists for the men’s version of the shoes also. The 47.5 (EU) of Topo Athletic is equivalent to the size 47 (EU) of Altra s both of them have the same length.

But, for US and UK regions, are represented by the same number for both the companies.

Madhusree Basu

Madhusree Basu

Author, Admin

Blogger and a fitness enthusiast. She loves running and Yoga and everything in between. She started running to manage her weight and to eat to her heart’s content. A true foodie at heart she shares whatever knowledge she has gained throughout the years about weight management and fitness.






10 Best Running Shoes For Blister-Prone Feet (Highly Rated)

10 Best Running Shoes For Blister-Prone Feet (Highly Rated)

Last Updated: June 15th, 2022

Disclosure: As an Amazon Associate and an affiliate for some reputed brands, I earn from qualifying purchases at no extra cost you. I may recieve a commission if you purchase something mentioned in this post. See more details here.

Blisters are annoying and pop up when you least want them (not that you ever want them, but you get the point…)

They are painful and take days to heal and leave nasty marks in their place of occupancy…

And unfortunately, some of us are more prone to blisters than others and with the hot combination of running shoes, we have to deal with this lingering problem almost every day…

Then what can you do?

There are two options, run barefoot…(still, there are chances of blisters and injuries) or, run wearing shoes that will reduce the chances of getting blisters…

Since you are here, I have a feeling that you like the second option…

If anything, go for Brooks Adrenaline GTS 22. This is a lightweight shoe with 3D print upper. It will not irritate your feet and create hot spots for blisters.

Also, we have selected the 10 best running shoes for blister-prone feet and we have tried to include a lot of different types of shoes to cater to different types of runners.

Best Running Shoes For Blister-Prone Feet (Detailed Review)

Brooks Adrenaline GTS 22

Brooks Adrenaline GTS 22 is one of my favorite running shoes. It is well constructed and is very comfortable.

Also, it provides you with excellent stability and knee protection.

What makes this good for blister-prone feet is that it has a no-sew construction. This means when you wear this shoe, there are no stitches that will rub against your skin to create hotspots.

This version of the shoe is slightly wider than the previous version. Your feet and toes will not feel cramped or suffocated while using this shoe.

Cramped space inside the toe box is one of the major reasons for blisters, especially on the little toe and the base of the big toe.

And if you have bunions, and have a tendency to get blisters, then wearing a narrower shoe is a sure shot way to get blisters.

However, with Adrenaline GTS, this is not the case. You will not feel that rubbing on the sides of the feet. If it was there may have can caused blisters.

 The insole is of premium quality and breathable. The finish of the insole is very smooth and doesn’t have rough patches. Also, it doesn’t have the tendency to bunch up and rub against the sole, especially under the toes.

So, there also, you are safe and may not have to deal with blisters.

Lastly, the ankle region and the heel area. Brooks throughout the years has perfected the shape of the heel and the ankle-cut height.

It is molded with a smooth collar that has a premium finish. Also, the inner area of the heel is also smooth and locks in your heels so that they cannot move around. This minimizes the rubbing and helps you to avoid blisters.

The tongue is also well padded and doesn’t move around while you are running. So, no part of your skin gets rubbed while running.

Also, this shoe doesn’t need breaking-in. A new shoe is many times cause of blisters when fresh out of the box. This is not the case with Brooks Adrenaline…

Pros

  • No-sew upper.
  • Available in multiple widths.
  • No breaking-in period is needed.
  • Lightweight.

Cons

  • Upper stretches.

New Balance 1080 v12

New Balance has recently released the next version of one of the most popular running shoes, 1080. The current version of New Balance 1080 is v12 and is from what I’m hearing in different forums, it is quickly becoming a very popular shoe.

What sets apart New Balance 1080 from the others is its midsole…

But that really is not the point of this post…

In this post, we are discussing how these shoes will not cause blisters…and is New Balance 1080v12 one of them?

Well, the upper of New Balance 1080 is made from engineered mesh and is 3D printed. In other words, it is a no-sew design. This means there is no stitch or thread to rub against your feet’s skin.

Also, the width of the New Balance 1080 is slightly more than some of the other shoes in its category. So cramping of your toes is out of the question. In that way, you may never have to deal with blisters in your toes and the forefoot.

The breathability of New Balance 1080 is good. If your feet have a tendency to become sweaty, then the ventilation of New Balance 1080 will prove useful. The lesser you sweat, the lesser the chance of getting blisters.

One thing, that was not great in the previous version of 1080 is the heel area. Many of them complained about heel slips. This kind of movement can cause blisters on blister-prone feet.

However, New Balance has changed the design of this version and has gone back to a more traditional heel cup with extended Achilles support.

This has minimized the heel slip and any other heel movement. Also, the well-padded collar area holds your ankle and heels in place and doesn’t let them slide around minimizing the chances of getting a blister.

The same goes for the tongue. It is well-padded and doesn’t slide around. The skin on the top of your feet doesn’t rub with the lacing system due to this and you don’t have to deal with blisters on the top of your feet. 

Pros

  • No-sew design for a bister-free experience.
  • Slightly wider toe-box.
  • Very cushy.

Cons

  • Runs big.
  • Color may bleed.

New Balance 880 v12

New Balance 880v12 is a good shoe for long miles, intense workouts, or just a casual run. It is excellent at shock absorption and will provide you with a good amount of comfort.

However, will it work for your blister-prone feet?

Let’s find out…

The upper of New Balance 880 is made from jacquard mesh. This is an engineered mesh and doesn’t require any stitching.

This eliminates the chances of rough stitching getting rubbed against your skin. This is why you have minimum chances of getting a blister from this kind of mesh.

Also, the wideish fit of this shoe reduces toe-cramping and hotspots throughout the feet, thus reducing the chances of blisters.

Being made of engineered mesh, this shoe is very breathable, causing you to break less sweat. This also minimizes the chances of blisters and keeps you comfortable throughout the run.

The insole is properly placed in the shoe and doesn’t bunch up. The smooth finish and no-bunching further reduce the chances of blisters under your feet.

The heel area of 880 resembles that of 1080 and functionality-wise, they perform almost similar. They don’t let the heel slip and the heel doesn’t move around to provide you with an uncomfortable feeling.

More importantly, this means, the skin at the back of your heels will not get rubbed with the inner lining of the heel cup and will not get irritated or form blisters.

Pros

  • Good breathability.
  • Wideish fit for a no-cramped fit.
  • Comfortable for long-distance running.
  • Well-cushioned.
  • No-sew upper.

Cons

  • Runs a bit small.
  • Forefoot is slighty harder than the rest of the shoe.

BROOKS LAUNCH 9

Brooks Launch 9 is one of the favorite running shoes in the responsive category. It is fast springy and provides you with excellent ride quality.

However, is it good for runners who have frequent issues with blisters?

First of all, the upper of Brooks Launch 9 is made of engineered mesh. It has overlays but they are only on the outer surface of the shoe.

This is good because this way, the inner lining feels smooth against the skin and will not irritate it to form blisters.

One of the main reasons for blisters is the additional heat that gets generated from friction. However, since that is absent, it is highly unlikely that you will have a blister from the upper of Launch 9.

The heel area of Launch 9 has adopted the new style. The heel is extended upwards and provides support to your Achilles area.

This also minimizes the movement of the heels and reduces the friction of the side of your heels with the lining of the heels.

This reduces the chances of your getting blisters in the heel area. Also, the reduction in chances of blisters is also due to the fact that the collar and the tongue are properly padded.

This keeps the sliding of your foot in check and also reduces the chances of blisters to the minimum.

Pros

  • The smooth inner lining and well padded.
  • Stylish.
  • Good responsiveness.

Cons

  • Runs a bit big.
  • Support could have been better.

Brooks Hyperion Elite 3

Brooks Hyperion Elite 3 is kind of interesting for me. This is a unisex shoe that seems like being loved by both men and women.

They are comfortable, lightweight, and great for your day-to-day run.

The upper of Brooks Hyperion Elite is made from engineered mesh which is non-sew. This protects your feet from any kind of friction and minimizes the chances of blisters.

Also, it is very breathable which makes your feet sweat less. The reduction of moisture along with a smooth lining, helps you be blister-free.

The heel area cradles your heels properly and doesn’t let them move or slide. This reduces further friction and any chances of blisters.

One thing that I observed may be of some concern…

There is a padded line just along with the opening of the heel cup. This creates a gap between the rest of the heel cup and the collar. 

This gap will not hug your heels and if there is some movement like if your heels are on the narrower side, may cause some friction. This creates a possibility of blisters, however, this may be very rare.

Also, just a note, Brooks Hyperion Elite is available only in medium or standard fit. So, if you have a wide foot, please avoid it…if you don’t want to end up with painful blisters.

Pros

  • Comfortable even for long-distance running.
  • Shock absorbing.
  • Stylish.
  • Unisex.

Cons

  • The cushion of the shoe feels firmer.

Adidas Ultraboost 22

Probably one of the best running shoes for comfort that is available today. It is supremely shock absorbing and has a toe-spring for easy toe-off.

Also, it has reduced its carbon footprint and now is using a lot of recycled material to create this shoe.

Although there are a lot of thread designs on the outer surface of this, this is not present on the inner side of the shoe. This is great as this will not cause irritation to your skin and cause blisters.

The tongue is an integrated tongue and doesn’t move around. This eliminates additional friction with the top of the feet.

Also, the padding of the tongue is decent and it doesn’t let the laces sink into the feet. This also eliminates any friction of the laces with your skin, which could have resulted in a blister.

The heel has an extended collar that supports the Achilles’ area. Also, the cup is decent and holds the heels in place. No shifting or movement of the heels helps in avoiding blisters in the heel area.

Pros

  • Very comfortable.
  • Fits like gloves to provide a customized fit.
  • Reduced carbon footprint.

Cons

  • Looks boring.
  • Slightly wider width is more desireable.

Asics Gel-Cumulus 24

ASICS Gel-Cumulus is a very comfortable running shoe and is great with shock absorption. It has gel cushioning at both the forefoot and the rearfoot and is excellent for any kind of running.

But will it work with your blister-prone feet?

Let’s find out…

The upper of Asics Gel-Cumulus is made from engineered mesh which is non-sew. This means it will not rub with your skin and create blisters.

The toe-box of Cumulus has decent width and your toes will not feel cramped. Also, this ensures that there will be no rubbing against the sides of your feet which is good if you have to tend to get blisters.

The mesh has a lot of holes or perforations to make it breathable. This comes in handy if you have sweaty feet. Also, due to the airflow, the amount of sweat produced is a bit less. Plus the sweat-wicking material of the internal lining absorbs it and dries very quickly.

This means, your feet don’t remain damp for long which is crucial if you want to avoid blisters.

The tongue is thick and padded and sits between the top of the foot and the laces. This ensures that the laces don’t rub with your skin to create blisters.

Also, the heel cup locks in the heels and it doesn’t slide around. This is essential to avoid blisters on the side of the heels.

There is no upward movement also, in the sense of heel slip. This makes sure that you don’t get a blister where the collar touches the skin at the back of the heels.

Pros

  • Cushy and shock absorbing.
  • Available in multiple widths.
  • Have multiple measures to avoid blisters.

Cons

  • Expensive.

Asics Gel-Venture 8

Asics Gel Venture is a good running shoe for both roads and the trails. However, it will not work on too technical trails.

This shoe seems to be an odd choice as this doesn’t look like a no-sew running shoe and surely it is not.

However, if you step into the shoe and you will be able to feel the smoothness of the lining and the comfort that it brings with it.

The stitches are not exposed and they don’t rub with the skin of your feet. This way, they will not irritate your feet’s skin and cause blisters.

Also, another aspect that will not let blisters to occur is the thick tongue of this shoe. It sits between the skin of the top of your feet and the laces. This protects this skin from getting exposed to the laces and getting rubbed.

This further reduces the chance of getting blisters. Also, the flat laces don’t dig in and create more problems for your skin.

Now comes the heel area. The heel cup locks in the heels and doesn’t let it slip or slide around. This minimizes the movement of the heels and doesn’t cause the skin at the side of the heels to rub against the shoe.

This reduces the occurrence of blisters and is great for keeping them at bay. 

One aspect that may be slight of concern is that it is not as breathable as Asics Cumulus. So, if you have sweaty feet, it is best to avoid them.

Pros

  • Good for roads and medium trails.
  • Excellent shock absorption.
  • Reasonable price.

Cons

  • Breathability is a bit less.

On Cloudflow

On Cloudflow is a racing shoe and is good for shorter-distance runs. It is cushy and responsive and provides you with a good energy return.

The upper of this shoe is a mesh construction which is very breathable and stretchable. This is essentially a no-sew construction like most of the other shoes in this list.

Also, the joint that you see near the heel cannot be felt inside the shoe. Essentially, the inner of the shoe is smooth and comfortable and doesn’t irritate your skin.

Same goes for the heel area. It is smooth and the heel cup holds the heels in place and provides you with excellent confort. Also, the heel doesn’t slide around and thus doesn’t rub on your skin.

This helps you to avoid blisters in the heels and around the ankle area.

The thick collar is also a contributor in this aspect.

One thing that concerned me was the flap like tongue of this shoe. I thought, that will cause the laces to dig in and make you uncomfortable.

However, the laces were flat and doesn’t dig in or mark your feet and the tongue doesn’t move around, providing you proper protection against the friction of laces against your top of the foot.

This helps you to avoid the blisters further and is great if you have a blister prone feet.

Pros

  • Excellent responsiveness.
  • Lightweight.
  • Doesn’t create a hotspot.

Cons

  • I would have loved a thicker tongue.

Salomon Speedcross 5

With all the road running shoes on the list, we didn’t want to leave our trail runners high and dry.

They also have their fair share of experience with blisters and maybe more so if they are used to running in humid or muddy conditions.

How will Speedcross help these runners with their blister situation?

First of all, Salomon SpeedCross like its road running counterparts has a mesh upper that doesn’t have stitches in them. 

Sure it has overlays, but they are exposed to the inside and don’t have stitches in them. This means that no part of the mesh rubs against your skin to create blisters.

Also, the thick tongue extends from the base of the toe to just passed the ankle joint. This acts as a protective layer between the skin of the top of the foot and the Quick lacing system.

This ensures that it doesn’t rub on the skin and provides you with a blister-free experience.

 The ankle area is also well padded and the heel locking system is also pretty good. You will not run into issues like heel slip or something similar. This ensures that you have minimal chances of getting a blister, if any.

Pros

  • Great for muddy trails.
  • No break-in time is needed.
  • Long-lasting.

Cons

  • They run a bit large.
  • Doesn’t come in wide.

FAQ

How to select a running shoe for blister-prone feet?

To select a running shoe for blister prone feet, you should have sufficient space in the toe box, the inner surface of the shoe should be smooth and there should not be any movement in the heel area.

Now let me explain:

Roomy Toe-box

When you don’t have sufficient space in the toe-box, your toes are cramped. This makes it uncomfortable for running, but also generates additional friction and sweat. This gives rise to blisters. It is very important that you have enough space in the toe-box not only when you wear it, but also when you spread the toes during landing and take-off.

Spacious shoe

Not only the toe-box, but the overall shoe should also be spacious enough to not cramp your feet. The reason is the same. You need to avoid additional sweat, heat, and friction to keep blisters at bay.

No or limited inner sewing

Threads and joints have a funny way of getting back at you and many times they will rub against your skin to irritate it.

No matter how smooth it feels, they tend to change their nature when you start running and irritate your skin. So, avoid running shoes with inner sewing.

Proper heel lock-in

The heels should be locked in place. If it moves around or slips, then you have chances of getting blisters either on the side of the heels or on the Achilles.

Tongue

The tongue must be thick. This protects the skin on the top of the feet from friction against the laces and blisters can be avoided.

Also, the tongue itself should not move for the same reason. For this a gusseted tongue is great.

Socks

No matter how careful you are in selecting your running shoes, there will be incidents where you may have missed something or the shoe behaved unexpectedly. In such cases, socks will protect you from blisters.

Also, if some small sand particle or stone gets into the shoe, you will not have to deal with it as the socks will protect you until then.

But wear properly fitting socks that are sweat-wicking else, it will be your primary source of blisters.

To prevent blisters from new running shoes, you need to select them properly so that it is overall spacious, has a smooth internal lining, a thick tongue, and collar, and good heel lock-in. Also, you need to break in the running shoe properly.

Top running shoes for blister-prone feet

Madhusree Basu

Madhusree Basu

Author, Admin

Blogger and a fitness enthusiast. She loves running and Yoga and everything in between. She started running to manage her weight and to eat to her heart’s content. A true foodie at heart she shares whatever knowledge she has gained throughout the years about weight management and fitness.